Jump to content

Stargazers Lounge Uses Cookies

Like most websites, SGL uses cookies in order to deliver a secure, personalised service, to provide social media functions and to analyse our traffic. Continued use of SGL indicates your acceptance of our cookie policy.

Russe

Imaging with the 130pds

Recommended Posts

Hi,

a couple of my recent images with the 130pds and Atik 460 (colour info, i.e. oiii comes from Megrez 72 taken last year).

cheers

Epicycle

post-25876-0-26284900-1423395175_thumb.j

post-25876-0-69726100-1423395199_thumb.j

  • Like 11

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Inspirational thread guys! Thank you!

A question if I may:  I am about to defork my 10" LX200 and put it on an ALT EQ6 using a losmandy plate.   My idea is to then piggyback a 103PDS onto the LX.  I was then thinking that when imaging with the 103 I could use the LX as a guidescope and vice versa.  Is this completely bonkers? (And what is the easiest way to piggyback the 103 on the LX). Just bought a 314L+ in anticipation!

Many thanks

Ig

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A lot of wonderful images taken by the 130PDS here! They inspired me to get my own recently. I must say its a pleasure to use and the images it produced are far better than I imagined coming from previously using some relatively Rubbish scopes.

Once I get my processing abilities up, I look forward to getting images something like that I see here!

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just tried mine out for the first time and in daytime with the eyepiece and focused on distant objects. It's actually the first time I've looked through a newt! The view was very clear but somewhat disturbed by an out of focus dark spot in the centre of the fov. Standing back from the eyepiece (28mm, 2") it became clear this was the mirror/spider vanes. Is it normal for them to impinge like that? There didn't seem to be anything wrong otherwise. Maybe collimation needed?

Louise

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i think it must be out of focus for you to see the secondary like that if it is in the center

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i think it must be out of focus for you to see the secondary like that if it is in the center

Um, I was focused perfectly on a distant spire (about a mile away). The dark area was like a small fuzzy (very out of focus) blob in the centre of the fov. I could almost ignore it but it was definitely there. As I say, standing away from the eyepiece revealed the secondary and vanes. Maybe my eyesight? Maybe because it was daytime?

Louise

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just looked again (cloudy twilight) and the dark spot was not apparent, suggesting it's a daylight phenomenon?

Louise

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hard to say, ive never looked through mine during the daytime. It shouldnt be a problem once you get a camera on it.

Surprisingly light these little newts are eh? Well, they are until you load them up with kit... I think mine doubled in weight when the imaging gear and legweights were attached (feels like it anyway!).

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just looked again (cloudy twilight) and the dark spot was not apparent, suggesting it's a daylight phenomenon?

Louise

Yup. Its a feature of reflectors in bright conditions.
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ok, guys - thanks! I'll have to properly check collimation when I get a minute, anyway. I've had the 150pds for a year now - never looked through it, never adjusted collimation either! I think the 130pds will be easier to collimate as it's that much shorter.

Rob - Mine doesn't feel all that light to me but I'm not very strong! For me, it still needs two hands to load it onto the mount (AVX). It'll definitely need extra counterweight, compared to the ST80, once I have a camera and guider on it. Looks like wall-to-wall cloud for the next week or more... :(

Louise

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hard to say, ive never looked through mine during the daytime. It shouldnt be a problem once you get a camera on it.

Surprisingly light these little newts are eh? Well, they are until you load them up with kit... I think mine doubled in weight when the imaging gear and legweights were attached (feels like it anyway!).

I used to be able to take my whole system outside in one go before I upgraded. Now I have to take the scope, mount and counterweight in seperate trips! Well worth it though - my previous kit was a SkyHawk 4.5" on EQ1! ;-)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I can see the same dark spot in my newt in daytime, Louise, but doesn't seem to appear at night.  It's also linked to the foacl length of the eyepiece, short focal length higher magn eyepieces don't show it

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi guys. Would appreciate any guidance on my post #328 above before i press the "BUY" button!

Many thanks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi guys. Would appreciate any guidance on my post #328 above before i press the "BUY" button!

Many thanks.

Hi

Personally,  your proposal doesn't feel right to me. Using the 130pds as a guide scope might work but keeping everything rigid could be a challenge. I'd have thought an oag for the lx200 would be better. Vice versa doesn't sound practical either. However, don't let me put you off getting a 130pds!

Louise

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Igwiz, on 09 Feb 2015 - 2:24 PM, said:

Inspirational thread guys! Thank you!

A question if I may:  I am about to defork my 10" LX200 and put it on an ALT EQ6 using a losmandy plate.   My idea is to then piggyback a 103PDS onto the LX.  I was then thinking that when imaging with the 103 I could use the LX as a guidescope and vice versa.  Is this completely bonkers? (And what is the easiest way to piggyback the 103 on the LX). Just bought a 314L+ in anticipation!

Many thanks

Ig

Not sure the LX will make a good guide scope since its a far longer FL than the 130pds. And with it being a longer FL, comes the problem of the star "jumping about" a bit too much, meaning that your autoguiding will respond accordingly (by jumping about). Perhaps a way to get it to work would be to adjust some of the PHD settings so its less sensitive. A better solution perhaps would be a separate, short focal length frac that will happily do both (ST80?) - you might even get away with a finderguider.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ok thanks guys.  I will go back to the simple set up - 130pds on an alteq6 (to allow heavier scopes in the future).  

Uranium  - are you suggesting the ST80 as a guidescope (the ones about £100 right?).  How does it mount onto the 130pds? Do I need to buy an extra mount plate?

My only other consideration is whether an ED80 is better than the 130pds?  It will sit on a permanent pier so I am leaning towards the 130.

Just want to press the button!!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The ST80 would be a better choice for a guidescope if you want to use it with both the LX or the 130pds. Normally a finderguider is good enough, but that probably wouldnt cut it with the focal length of the LX200 (finders can only guide you up to about 1000mm FL). Having said that, the 130pds would happily guide the 200LX.

But.... hang on a mo - the alarm bells are ringing in the weight department. If you combine a 10" SCT with a newt (on a dual saddle), with all the imaging gubbins... and then chuck on an ST80 - thats going to be quite a lump (even for an NEQ6). Plus there is the downside that if mounted, there is no way of adjusting the LX/130 to match, not unless you invest in a quite expensive (and heavy) adjustable saddle. So in conclusion, its probably best to only use one - not both. Using both will just over complicate things when really, all you want is to be up and running as soon as possible.

As for whether the 80ED is better than the 130? Well I have both, and while the 80ED can yield some fantastic, sharp images (if given time) - its just nowhere near as fast as the 130pds (especially when reduced). In the last 12 months I think the 80ED has been out only twice, but it didnt take long for me to get the thirst for speed again. But I still wont sell the 80ED, I still have plans for it (would be nice to turn it into a solar scope with a quark ep) - plus its always good to have a reliable backup telescope should anything go horribly wrong.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm planning to buy a 130p-ds to be my main imaging rig, does it need a coma corrector?

Also, i can't find anywhere a store in the US or here in brazil that sells it. Guess I'll have to import it from the UK anyway.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Cheers Uranium.  Yep, I have already abandoned the idea of piggybacking the 130 and the LX together. Just the 130 solo with the ST80 (thanks for the advice on that) on an alteq6.  Only thing I am still grappling with is how the ST80 sits on the 130 (do I need to be anything extra to do that?) and whether my Atik 314L will find focus or whether I need an extension tube of some variety?  Want "Night 1" to be as painless as poss!! Nearly there!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@happy-kat Yes thanks. Just can't quite fathom what hardware is needed to mount the ST80. Then i can make a decision! (Andi think i want to avoid the parfocal sheadaches!)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm planning to buy a 130p-ds to be my main imaging rig, does it need a coma corrector?

Also, i can't find anywhere a store in the US or here in brazil that sells it. Guess I'll have to import it from the UK anyway.

Hi

They have different names over the pond i.e. BKP 130 DS. This is the site in Canada:

http://ca.skywatcher.com/_english/01_products/02_detail.php?sid=336

It's probably better to use a coma corrector - depends how ambitious/fussy you are with your images!

There appears to be a Brazilian deler: http://armazemdotelescopio.com.br/loja/index.php/telescopios but doesn't specifically list a 130pds. Maybe they can order one in for you?

Louise

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Igwiz, on 11 Feb 2015 - 06:49 AM, said:

Cheers Uranium.  Yep, I have already abandoned the idea of piggybacking the 130 and the LX together. Just the 130 solo with the ST80 (thanks for the advice on that) on an alteq6.  Only thing I am still grappling with is how the ST80 sits on the 130 (do I need to be anything extra to do that?) and whether my Atik 314L will find focus or whether I need an extension tube of some variety?  Want "Night 1" to be as painless as poss!! Nearly there!

Take a look at the post linked by happy-kat, it goes into the question of whether you really need an ST80 to guide a 130pds. Which in reality, is a bit of overkill - not unless you plan to use it with the LX200 as well.

To mount the ST80, you can either get a dual vixen saddle and guidescope rings. Or to go the cheap route you can just bolt another dovetail and the tube rings directly to the top of your 130pds tube rings. Theyre an M6 thread if im not mistaken. The aforementioned method means you have no adjustment because its fixed, but they should be aligned well enough to guide off. Another downside is that you have made your rig quite "tall", so as it tracks the sky - gravity will have more of an effect on the balance.

If the 130 is going to be your primary imaging telescope, and you have a spare 9x50 finder - then I'd just go with that. All you need then is a half decent guide cam with an on camera st4 port - that will plug straight into your EQ6 st4, and youre up and running! (barring a little configuration of PHD). 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi

They have different names over the pond i.e. BKP 130 DS. This is the site in Canada:

http://ca.skywatcher.com/_english/01_products/02_detail.php?sid=336

It's probably better to use a coma corrector - depends how ambitious/fussy you are with your images!

There appears to be a Brazilian deler: http://armazemdotelescopio.com.br/loja/index.php/telescopios but doesn't specifically list a 130pds. Maybe they can order one in for you?

Louise

Thank you, Louise

Didn't know they had different names. Gonna make a search fo it.

that brazilian site you gave me is the store i bought my current telescope and it's a very good store, i contacted them but they don't sell it and are not importing at the moment.

For the moment i think i'll pass on the coma corrector right now as i'm still learning, maybe later when i get more demanding :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   1 member

  • Similar Content

    • By deanchapman2705
      Hi,
      I'm relatively new to the whole telescope thing but have done my research and was fixed on getting the Orion skyquest XT8i or XT10i. By spending that much money, I didn't like the idea of purchasing it online from their website without seeing it in person (and not having the reassurance of being able to take it back) and looked for stores in the UK that would supply them. After plenty of research, it seems like they don't exist anymore and they are only in the US? Is this right or could anyone help me?
      (I've looked at the Sky-watcher 250PX/200PX flextube skyscan goto but it is significantly heavier and the noise of the goto mechanism sounds like a table saw so that's put me off of it...)
      Any help would be much appreciated,
      Thanks
    • By AstroMuni
      In my own journey while learning this process and seeing similar areas of confusion among others, I decided to compile this FAQ.
      This FAQ has been put together using a combination of information from SkyWatcher manuals, my own experience and suggestions by various contributors on the forums. As most of the confusion is around the newer reticle, this FAQ deals with this in detail.
      Q: What is Polar alignment and why is it needed?
      A: Polar alignment refers to the act of aligning the Polar axis of an Equatorial mount telescope, so that it is parallel with the axis that the Earth revolves around. It makes the job of following objects across the sky much easier.
      Its of minor benefit to the visual astronomer but a necessity to the astrophotographer who is trying to take images of the night sky. Once a telescope is polar aligned and an object centred in the eyepiece, then assuming an RA motor is attached to the telescope, the object will stay centred. The better the polar alignment, the longer it will stay there.
      If no motor is attached then simply nudging the telescope around one axis will bring the object back to the centre of the eyepiece again.
       
      Q: Do I need to accurately do a Polar alignment?
      A: If you are a visual astronomer then its not that critical and you should be able to manage just doing a simple polar alignment by positioning the mount so that Polaris is in the centre of the reticle.
      But if you are doing astrophotography with long exposures then accurate polar alignment becomes critical to improve the quality of the images.
       
      Q: My reticle looks different to what is shown in the manual.
      A: There are 2 versions of this – the older one which has a bubble showing the location of Polaris Fig.1 and the newer one which has a clock face Fig.2.

      Figure 1
       

      Figure 2
       
      Q: How do I Polar align with the new Reticle?
      A: As Polaris is not located exactly at the North Celestial Pole (NCP), we can see it orbit the North Celestial Pole in a polar scope. The large circle seen in the centre of the pattern in Fig.2 is a representation of the Polaris’ orbit around the North Celestial Pole. When performing the polar alignment process, it is necessary to determine the orientation of the Polaris on the circle. The reticle is marked like a clock face with 0 at the top. Imagine this is the 12 position in a traditional clock.
      At the end of the initialization of the SynScan hand control, after entering the proper local longitude, latitude, date, time, and daylight-saving time, the SynScan hand controller will display the message: “Polaris Position in P.Scope=HH:MM”. Imagine the larger circle in Fig.2 as a clock’s face with 12:00 at the top, with the current time pointing to the “HH:MM”. The orientation of the hour hand of the clock represents the orientation of Polaris in the polar scope. Put the Polaris to the same orientation on the large circle to finish the polar alignment.
      In case you don’t use the Synscan hand controller, there are several apps available on Android and IOS which give you the position of Polaris on the clock face (such as SynscanInit for Android and Polar Scope Align for IOS). Skwatcher has their own app as well called Synscan Pro which shows the position of Polaris in the new reticle.
      The Polaris position also changes as time passes. The reticle displays 3 circles to represent Polaris’s orbit in the year 2012, 2020 and 2028. It also gives sub-dials at 0, 3, 6, and 9 o’clock position for year 2016, 2024 and 2032. An engraving labeled with the above years is also displayed on the right of the FOV for memo purpose. When doing polar alignment in the Northern hemisphere, the user should put Polaris on the correct circle corresponding to the present year for better alignment precision.
      This reticle is also covered in the SW EQ6-R manual.
       
      Q: When I position my mount in the Home position with the counterweight at its lowest point, the 0 mark on the reticle is not at the top. Is this a fault and how can I fix it?
      A: There is nothing wrong with your mount You just need to rotate the mount in the RA axis till the 0 is at its highest position. Now lock the RA axis and continue with the alignment process.
       
      Q: How can I ensure that the 0 is accurately positioned at the very top?
      A: 1) Firstly, level the mount and set it up pointing north as if making it ready for polar alignment.
      2) Next use the Alt and Az bolts to centre Polaris in the reticle - i.e. put Polaris right in the centre of the cross-hairs, not on any circle. Be as accurate as you can. 
      3) Now using ONLY the Alt bolts, move Polaris vertically upward in the reticle from its central position until it reaches any of the circles.
      4) Because you started with Polaris dead centre and moved it only vertically, Polaris is now exactly in the zero (12 o’clock) position on the circle. Now rotate the RA axis to put the reticle zero mark in exactly the same position as Polaris. Again, be as accurate as you can.
      5) Lock the RA axis in this position and using a marker pen put alignment marks on the mount housing so that you can find this position again without the need to use Polaris.
      [Courtesy Jif001 on SGL]
       
      Q: How do I Polar align with the older reticle?
      A: Here is a good article http://www.astro-baby.com/astrobaby/help/polar-aligning-the-skywatcher-heq5orion-sirius-mount/
       
      Q: How can I check if my polarscope reticle is aligned with the RA axis of the mount?
      A: Before using the polar scope for polar alignment, the polar scope itself must be calibrated to ensure the pattern in the polar scope is aligned to the mount’s R.A. axis. The following steps will outline how to calibrate the polar scope:
      This process is best done during daytime. Choose a fixed object (eg. a faraway object such as the tip of a TV antenna). Centre the reticle on the object by adjusting the two azimuth adjustment knobs and the two elevation adjustment bolts. Rotate the mount in R.A. axis for half a turn (180 degrees). Tighten the R.A. clutch after the rotation. If the object remains at the centre of the reticle in the polar scope after the rotation, then it means the polar scope has been aligned to the R.A. axis and no calibration is needed. If its not aligned, read this article which explains how to recalibrate https://www.myastroscience.com/polarscopecalibration There are also videos on YouTube that explain this process.
      Hope this helps. 🙂
      Do let me know if you have other questions (and answers) and I can add to this.
       
    • By NallyFace
      Hello,
      Is anyone on here signed up for the SkySafari and SynScan beta testing to natively support IOS? If so how has it been going?
      https://support.simulationcurriculum.com/hc/en-us/community/posts/360043282514-Beta-Testing-SkySafari-6-iOS-Only-SynScan-WiFi-Read-This-To-Participate-?page=2#community_comment_360012192693
      Its 2020.
       
       
    • By GavinC
      I thought the recent email exchange between Skywatcher support and myself might be of interest, as there appears little information available on this feature.
      ===========================================
      Hi Gavin,
      Regarding "Alignment Sharing", please see the description below.
      ## Alignment Sharing
      Alignment data is stored in each individual app instance. This means if you performed alignment using one app instance, only it will have the newly created alignment data. If another app instance connects to the same mount, it will not have access to the new alignment data.
      The alignment sharing feature (**Utility > Alignment Sharing**) allows one app instance to send a copy of alignment data to another app instance. For it to work, the devices running the app instances must be on the same local area network (eg connect to the same Wi-Fi network). The sending instance turns on **Share my alignment**, while the receiving instance turns off this option. The receiving instance should then see the shared alignment data appear in a list. Loading alignment data overwrites the previous alignment data.

      You can use the Alignment Sharing to transfer the alignment data to another device after completing a Star Alignment. For example, you have done and successfully complete 2-Star alignment with your smartphone and then you can use the Alignment Sharing function to share the alignment data to the SynScan Pro App Windows program which is running on your PC. Then you don't have to do the alignment again to control the same AZ GOTO mount with the Windows SynScan App because it has the same alignment result as your smartphone has.
      If you have any questions, please feel free to let us know.
      Thank you.
      SynScan App Team

      On Wed, Jun 24, 2020 at 1:22 AM Gavin Cox wrote:
      Hello,
      I have just seen you have updated the Synscan app firmware to 1.19.  I have this installed on a Win PC and Android phone and use it to control a AZ GOTO mount running the latest firmware using the Synscan Wifi Dongle.
      There looks to be some new functionality under the utility menu called 'alignment sharing', but I can't find any documentation in the help files on this?
      Please can you detail how it can be used?  If both my phone and PC are connected to the SynScan WiFi hotspot and I perform an alignment on my phone will the app on the PC recognise this too (or vice versa)?
      Thank you,
      Gavin
    • By Batesy82
      Hi guys,
      I've literally just signed up so I'm totally new here and excited to learn from all you professional astromaster... 
      I'm not sure if this is the right place to post so I do apologise if not... 
      I'm after a skywatcher eq3 pro goto mount for my celestron astromaster 130eq every website i go on they are out of stock and not available for a couple of months 🙄 does anybody know a stockist that has these in stock? I've only been in the astrophotography hobby 4 weeks so I've got lots to learn... 
       
      Thank you for your help 
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.