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Jadeyhc

Any good books to help?

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Hello everyone,

As I'm new to astronomy and still learning a lot about the stars, planets etc...also still trying to get the hang of my new telescope, I've read a book called " a little course in astronomy" which I enjoyed reading and learning so much it was done with in a few days :) would any one recommend any books, apps for phones etc?

Thanks

Jade :D

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Hi there. A book called 'Turn left at Orion' is probably your best bet. It's aimed at people with little or no experience. Excellent book.

Ally

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Hi there. A book called 'Turn left at Orion' is probably your best bet. It's aimed at people with little or no experience. Excellent book.

Ally

I also want to get a book suitable for beginners, so I'm going to take your word for it and get it from Amazon. 

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- Practical Astronomy by Storm Dunlop http://www.amazon.co...ds=storm dunlop


- The One Minute Astronomer - http://www.amazon.co...nute astronomer


- Astronomy for Dummies by Stephen Maran - http://www.amazon.co...ing for dummies


- Star Watch by Philip Harrington - http://www.amazon.co...ilip harrington


- How It Began by Chris Impey - http://www.amazon.co...rds=chris impey


- Universe: The definitive visual guide - http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/1409376508/ref=s9_simh_bw_p14_d0_i2?pf_rd_m=A3P5ROKL5A1OLE&pf_rd_s=center-3&pf_rd_r=0VDSPR509J1CH5Z5DFXA&pf_rd_t=101&pf_rd_p=365324827&pf_rd_i=266239


 


I highly recommend these to you. You can often pick these up quite cheap on Amazon for Kindle....


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Hi Jade and Welcome,

A must book for the beginner and oldie alike, is Turn Left at Orion. Any books by Sir Patrick Moore are well worth the read.

As for apps. I'm new to tablets, but have found SkEye and Night Sky Tools both good android apps. For PC and laptop, Stellarium is worth installing.

There are so many books out their, but what you really need is a book to help you learn the night sky. Easy constellation to get to learn is Orion, look for the three stars that form the belt. Once you have found Orion, use the sky map to hop to the next constellation, this can all be done without a scope at first. You will find after a while that the constellation become second nature.

What ever you do, enjoy it, it the wonder of the universe from your own back garden.

Chris

Sent from my Hudl HT7S3 using Tapatalk

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As above . Turn left at Orion , is ideal for showing where objects are and what they should look like through the telescope .

If you want a book for general advice on equipment and how things work ect. I'd recomend " backyard astronomers guide"

Many of these astro books are available on amazon , which have a handy review and rating from purchasers which can give you some feedback and an idea of how people rate a particular book.

" night watch " is a popular book too as a general reference .

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Another one for Turn left at Orion you wont go wrong that its a first class book 

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A great book with a wealth of information is....... " Norton's Star Atlas and Reference Handbook " ISBN 0-13-145164-2

I believe this book is in its 21st edition, I have the 20th.  It has been revised and published since the 1930s

See if you local Library has, or can get you a copy. It's an outstanding tutorial.   :smiley:

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Another vote for Turn Left. Great book if you want to learn to find stuff in the sky.

If you're after something that's less of a reference book then I have some suggestions:

1. "How I Killed Pluto and Why it Had it Coming" by Mike Brown. Great read on the trans-Neptunian objects and solar system in general. Plus there's some engrossing scientific fraud and intrigue.

2. "Seeing in the dark:..." by Timothy Ferris. It's got some great anecdotes about amateur astronomers.

3. "The Day we Found the Universe" by Marcia Bartusiak. The story of how we discovered the true size of the universe. Describes the work of Hubble and his contemporaries, including how the great era of US observatory building was initiated and executed. 

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Go on a website called www.thebookpeople.co.uk , they have a few astronomy books and fairly cheaper. Or go to a book store called The Works, browse through them also cheap.

Apps I use the night sky 1 and 2 and star chart. Theres also one called solar walk which is very informative.

Also Wikipedia I'm sure will help abit :)

Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk HD

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Hi there. A book called 'Turn left at Orion' is probably your best bet. It's aimed at people with little or no experience. Excellent book.

Ally

I've just started reading this one, and I'm hooked already! 

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Turn left at Orion is great but i wish i had bought the spiral bound version rather than the Kindle version due to the nature in which the book is meant to be used. 

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A book that I always recommend is the Backyard Astronomer's Guide by Dickinson and Dyer. It's a great intro to all aspects of the hobby without being too simple. I leaf through it often and still find new things.

I also agree with the comments on Turn Left..... I am still working through it ticking off what I've seen.

Norton's is good too for lots of info. The start charts are not as clear as some more modern ones though and the book is a bit big for 'out in the field' so I prefer Sky and Telescope's Pocket Sky Atlas - ring bound and a good size for having next to you at the scope.

Cheers

Kerry

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Left turn gets my vote, I also use skEye on android and I've also printed some charts from astrotom.com which map out Messier objects...

Clear sky's

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Another vote for Turn Left at Orion - great book. The latest edition is spiral bound (perfect for using in the field) and has realistic sketches of what to expect to see through different scopes along with descriptions of targets and how to find them

Sent from my Nexus 4 using Tapatalk

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Hi there. A book called 'Turn left at Orion' is probably your best bet. It's aimed at people with little or no experience. Excellent book.

Ally

Yep I got this, its easy toread and full of great information

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After reading all the posts I once again have visited amazon and spent money, although I prefer the phrase "invest"  money :smiley:

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Another vote for 'Turn Left....' . Seems to aimed at those new to astronomy and helps you plan an evening's viewing. Would also get a decent star atlas to help find stuff that's in the vicinity, so you can spend a decent amount of time in one area of sky rather than slewing all over the sky like you're manning an anti-aircraft gun during the Blitz :grin:

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I just got "Turn Left at Orion" last week and can't help but praise it enough.

I am also finding "Illustrated Guide to Astronomical Wonders" very good.

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Yep Turn Left is a given (but as stated previously) get the physical spiral bound copy, not a tablet edition. my copy has got pages falling out of it now and grass stains all over it...thats the way it was meant to be used!

It should give you a basic primer to find the key constellations during each month, or quarter of the year, and what targets are suitable.

Any of the Phillips books are quite good (and cheap). the guide to the night sky is about £5, and will show you how to start jump from constellation to constellation, and written by the late great Sir Patrick Moore.

Good luck on your journey into this fabulous hobby.

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Another vote for Turn Left, I bought it on recommendation from SGL peeps and it really gives you a good insight and "plan of attack" for an evenings viewing....if the clouds ever part that is. Still, all the bad weather does suggest that astronomy purchases are through the roof, so that has to be a good thing right? :)

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