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Dalby Forest Starfest 2014 (Aug 22nd-24th) organised by Scarborough & Ryedale AS


AndyExton
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Only just got home from Dalby as we continued on to Flamborough for a couple of days..........................................................

Sorry to be honest but i found a few issues that surprised me at Dalby, the use of Laser pens and what seemed to be high power hunting lamps, plus various other white lights! 

On a plus side this was well organised and the skies were good

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Only just got home from Dalby as we continued on to Flamborough for a couple of days..........................................................

Sorry to be honest but i found a few issues that surprised me at Dalby, the use of Laser pens and what seemed to be high power hunting lamps, plus various other white lights! 

On a plus side this was well organised and the skies were good

It was only when it was extremely foggy that the green lasers were out (i hope). Otherwise the no lasers and white light rule is normally strictly applied. The 2 million candlepower white light was a bit ( actually a lot) bright Again i think it was someone who had not been before and i am sure the organisers would have had a polite word if it had been clear. I think the police car and fire the interlopers had, caused me a few more issues especially as it was clear by then-ruined my dark adaptation for a while. a bit annoying that they could not be ejected because it is private land.

anyway I hope you enjoyed it apart from that.

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It was only when it was extremely foggy that the green lasers were out (i hope). Otherwise the no lasers and white light rule is normally strictly applied. The 2 million candlepower white light was a bit ( actually a lot) bright Again i think it was someone who had not been before and i am sure the organisers would have had a polite word if it had been clear. I think the police car and fire the interlopers had, caused me a few more issues especially as it was clear by then-ruined my dark adaptation for a while. a bit annoying that they could not be ejected because it is private land.

anyway I hope you enjoyed it apart from that.

I quite agree that the various light show only happened during the fog, but i have never seen this at a star party, any way enough said

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Yes we do say in our mailings before the camp that red light and no green lasers apply for the camp.  We were aware of the use of lasers by some during the thick fog that rolled in on Saturday night but as soon as the skies started clearing again, normal service was resumed so everyone could enjoy the dark skies.

As Michael says the police probably caused more distraction when attempting to remove the unwanted visitors.  This is something that happened for the first time in the 14 Starfests and we are raising with the Forestry Commission to ensure a repeat will not occur in future.

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For me i don't see any problems with lights when it is foggy or cloudy and felt the light rules were well respected once it cleared. Ive spent many an hour in a "beer tent" with a few lights on waiting for it to clear, with things going to blackout once stars appear.

My big bugbear are lights in tents when folk finish a nights observing, if it's still clear then we all need to remember that red light rules apply inside tents too.

Cheers

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For me i don't see any problems with lights when it is foggy or cloudy and felt the light rules were well respected once it cleared. Ive spent many an hour in a "beer tent" with a few lights on waiting for it to clear, with things going to blackout once stars appear.

My big bugbear are lights in tents when folk finish a nights observing, if it's still clear then we all need to remember that red light rules apply inside tents too.

Cheers

I think the issue really is that not so long ago Starcamps were mainly the domain of more experienced? or longer term Astronomers.

as Astronomy has for the want of a better word become more "mainstream" with the publicity it is now receiving via Stargazing live and the Dark sky parks and press more and more "casual" observers are now going.

Personally i think this is a great thing as the more people that see the natural beauty our "sometimes" clear sky the better.

It is just not understanding the rules and the reason behind them that cause the occasional hicup. Lights can be put out but it is when people come badly prepared for the cold that concerns me most. There have been instances at Kielder when people have virtually got hypothermia due to lack of awareness (ignorance is too strong a word but you get my drift).

The rules are stated and displayed but it may be worth asking when people book if they have been to a starcamp before and if not going into greater detail with them.

I really don't know what the answer is but if anyone does it should be shared so we can all benefit.

If you can tell me how to stop young children shining bright white torches in my face when we have a public event down at the Observatory I would also appreciate it.  :grin:

or how to stop my car with its automatic this and that and lights flashing when i lock it.

It may be better to start a new thread if this conversation is to continue as it was not part of the original reason the thread was started.

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As a first time starcamp goer I felt that the guidelines were perfectly clear. Since I spend a lot of time on the Internet I was aware of the etiquette though. I only took two low power red lights and avoided opening my car door due to the internal lights - not very difficult to grasp unless you're the sort of person who doesn't read emails properly. Being asked when checking in if I knew what was expected might be a good idea though.

Edited by Joseki
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Thanks everyone.

The recent discussions I will pass on at our upcoming committee meeting that will mainly be to review Starfest ahead of starting planning #DalbyStarfest15.  I like the idea suggested above by John about being asked at check in about what was expected.

Overall though I think the feedback on here and social media has been very positive and as organisers I think we can be pleased with how the event is running and continues to grow in quality.  Certainly helps when the weather is kind rather than washing out a weekend.

See you all next year! :)

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We chat on the forum but when at a star party never know who each person is off SGL. Pity.

Michael,

All you need to do is walk around the campsite shouting "OutThereSomewhere" at the top of your voice and I'll say hello when I hear you...

...unless the men in white coats get you first :grin:  :eek: !

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