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Supernova in M82

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Just had to put the VX10 out on the deck, to try for the Supernova,not the best for darkness-but it is what it is.....and I saw it.Followed the big dippers stars up,M82 came right into view with the17mm... tried the 10mm too,both results good.

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Lovely clear gaps in the clug this morning and a cracking view,post-6974-0-43735500-1390455158_thumb.jp

Nick.

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Lovely clear gaps in the clug this morning and a cracking view, image.jpg

Nick.

Lovely sketch Nick. Spotted your deliberate mistake though, M82 surely? :-).

Going to have a go tonight

Stu

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M82 is not one I've attempted to find from Bushy Park, so I've no idea if I'll see the galaxy, let alone the supernova. But the forecast for tonight is encouraging so I'm going to give it a go...

DD

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Well done chaps and chappesses,

                                                 Got out again early this morning (sky was a little milky).

                         It looks just as good upside-down, possibly a little brighter (Thats obviously more to do with its intrinsic

brightness increasing, Im not trying to claim it brightens when upside down).

Although it's is occupying a much larger area of space, and is much, hotter, energetic and frankly furious we are basically

looking at a White-dwarf and some of it's best mate's gas 12 million lightyears away. It's probably the size of the kuiper-belts

orbits by now.

The weather has closed in again here, probably until sometime Saturday if the Met Office have it right, tonight into tomorrow

is supposed to be awful.  Still, give it time to brighten and I may be able to use it to find M82 in the 1st place.

Clear skies

Mick.

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Can anyone give me any tips with regards to locating this, I really don't want to miss it...

IF you get the two pointers in your finder, travel upwards that distance again (north) and then west for half of that distance

and lock off the scope.   (should be a brightish pair of stars in the fov).

Mooch around that point with your eye to the eye-piece and you should spot M81-82 quite quickly.

Mick

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M82 is not one I've attempted to find from Bushy Park, so I've no idea if I'll see the galaxy, let alone the supernova. But the forecast for tonight is encouraging so I'm going to give it a go...

DD

Not sure what your skies are like.  I could see it in a small telescope - although not very obvious. If it is brightening you will have a chance. Expect to see two smudges m81 and 82.  At in the slight haze of m82 a odd flicker/ speck of a star at the edge of visability - a 10 mag star is very close to the galaxy.  Hope you see it.

andrew

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I chucked some info into a limiting magnitude calculator for my scope and skies (mag 4.5 NELM) and it says I should get to mag 12.5 ish with my 4". Worth a go anyway.<br />

<br />

Also just to add, I saw M82 in 15x50 binos the other night so should be quite do-able in the scope.<br />

<br />

Stu

Edited by BigMakStutov

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Anyone know a time period this is expected to be very bright for, i.e. like it is now?

I got one more day of work after today, so tonight would be my only chance till Saturday night.

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I believe it should brighten over the next few days or even longer so you should get a chance it it

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Hmmmm....had a grab and go look at 6 with the Lightbridge.

It might have been the appalling atmosphere, but it looked a lot less bright than this morning.

Fingers crossed that it'll pep up,

Nick.

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Just got it myself in the 4". Challenging but great to see :-)<br />

<br />

Stu

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IF you get the two pointers in your finder, travel upwards that distance again (north) and then west for half of that distance

and lock off the scope.   (should be a brightish pair of stars in the fov).

Mooch around that point with your eye to the eye-piece and you should spot M81-82 quite quickly.

Mick

Thank you for the advice. I'm going to try again tonight, weather permitting.

With a 5.1" scope and a 25mm EP I am guessing the size will be rather small? I haven't found it before so not absolutely certain on what to expect and I think knowing what I should look out for in realistic terms would be advantageous.

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I have just come in from viewing this, and what a fantastic sight, my first supernova! One question though, in relation to the entire galaxy, it looks like it could be huge, how would something this size effect other stars and planets nearby?

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I have just come in from viewing this, and what a fantastic sight, my first supernova! One question though, in relation to the entire galaxy, it looks like it could be huge, how would something this size effect other stars and planets nearby?

Actually the size is a bit of an illusion. The supernova is actually a tiny spot of light - like all stars - and only seems big because of the airy disc which occurs due to diffraction of photons. The only things in the night sky which don't appear as points if light are the planets - they appear as discs. And also some of the larger closer stars (like Betelguese) I think have been resolved as discs photographically...

Hope that makes sense, hopefully someone will correct me if I'm wrong...

Dave.

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Thanks for the explanation, must be pretty impressive sight if you're nearby!

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No problem :-)

I imagine you could read by it at night and see it during the day of were on a planet orbiting a neighbouring star. Much like the crab nebula in 1054 (although that was a core collapse Supernova, not a type 1a).

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Any orbiting planets would get marmalized (technical term :-) )<br />

<br />

Not sure on the effects for objects at light year distances but I imagine nearby stars would also get hit quite hard

Edited by BigMakStutov

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Just having my first look at this supernova. Difficult to see visually due to light pollution but very bright using the Watec camera onto a TV monitor. That's an understatement - it's amazing.

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Thank you for the advice. I'm going to try again tonight, weather permitting.

With a 5.1" scope and a 25mm EP I am guessing the size will be rather small? I haven't found it before so not absolutely certain on what to expect and I think knowing what I should look out for in realistic terms would be advantageous.

Having the same stuff you've got, you should see M81 and M82 both in the FOV using your 25mm. There will be plenty of area around them. If you're trying in the evening, M81 will be to the left and is more obvious of the two as an oval fuzz. M82 will be a straight fuzz and is to the right. At this powere they may be hard to spot so take your time. Also avoid the moonrise but that is currently after midnight. Referencing the photo in NYTECAM's post #20 on is thread, this is the shape of what you will roughly see of M82, albeit much more dim, and you also need to flip his picture upside down to approximately simulate the inversion from the newt. Approximate because the actual view will rotate as the evening wears on. Note that the supernova forms a line of 4 stars with it being the last star in the chain. When you spot the galaxy just use these to find your way. You will need to switch to higher mag for that final bit, like the 10mm.

I've just viewed it (hurray!) and much of the time was using averted vision. It is dimmer than the next star in the chain but was pleasantly surprised by how easy it was! Think this is my first one too, woohoo!

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This is a big one!!! The galaxy is about 11.5 million light years away and yet one single point is shedding that much light. The absolute magnitude must be staggering! Well and away the most prominent point in that whole galaxy, which of itself is massive.

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Using a higher power will help as it darkens the background and allows you to see fainter stars. It was easier for me at higher power (5mm for me), and not really visible at lower (10mm)<br />

<br />

Stu

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That's true, Stu, I was working with a 5mm at 130x.

Best thing about this was the forecast was supposed to be cloudy yet it is still clear, ha ha ha!

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