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robin_astro

bright supernova in M82 (mag 11.7)

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I have a skywatcher 90 ....

Sent from my HTC One X using Tapatalk

Depending on your skies I think you'll struggle unless it does brighten significantly. Last night I just got it in a very good 106mm refractor with the dimmest naked eye star at mag 4.2. If you were under mag 5.5 or better skies you might get it but it's tough for a new observer.

It is predicted to brighten so perhaps it will be easier in a few days or a week. Keep an eye on the forum

Stu

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Thanks stu....I will ...just learning the basics just now and enjoying the forum

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Here my quickie RO spectrum from tonight in 30s via Lodestar-M on 30cm f/3.3 SCT binned 2x2 and rescaled with 2D profile via AstroArt  - there's a hint of H-alpha for M82 core so maybe 'dip' is Si - more images to stack tomorrow :police:

post-21003-0-68342500-1390691566_thumb.j

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Robin,

I am using a 300 grating with my Lhitres III what exposure time do you advise.

Jack

Hi Jack,

Paolo  used 23 x 6 min exposure for his latest spectrum with the LHIRES and a 150 grating but he was complaining of very poor 6 arcsec seeing 

http://www.spectro-aras.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=5&t=766

All things being equaly you would need ~ double the exposure for the 300 grating to get the same SNR,  but the exposure will depend on your aperture, focal length, seeing and  the slit width.  

 I think with my LHIRES setup I would use a 35um slit and 10 or perhaps 20 min subs and sum enough to get a good SNR 

Cheers

Robin

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Can I ask a quick super nova question?

When the white dwarf reaches its critical mass and goes kaboom, is it fission, fusion or both that drives the kaboom?

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As I understand it fusion is the main energy source.For fission to contribute energy, the elements undergoing fission must be heavier than iron, and these elements are rare.

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