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If that mount you have is the one I think you have (same as the NexStar SLT) there won't be a wedge, and no way, without some modding, I don't know how much, to use one. The costs involved would proba

450D and a copy of APT, I'd say James

Canon has by far the best Astro software support - almost everything is designed to work with the brand.  If you want new then look at  http://www.camerapricebuster.co.uk/Canon/Canon-Digital-SLRs   for prices.  Second hand is quite good enough and you could try the big chain store "clearance" facilities on the bay of fleas - often returns with nothing wrong with them!  For Astro you only actually need the camera body, which helps with the cost.

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The Canon 450D is also worth a look.

Pixel count isn't really that much of an issue unless it's because the sensor is bigger.  Sensitivity and noise are more important to consider.

James

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For what its worth I found this review of Canon 650D v Nikon D3200. The section on sensitivity and noise make interesting reading.http://www.digitalrev.com/article/canon-650d-vs-nikon-d3200/MTM5ODI2NTY0. At the end of the day you pays your money and makes your choice. I don't think either will disappoint.

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I am firmly in the Canon camp. Make sure it has live view and if possible the flip out rotating screen...

Plus I use Back Yard Eos which is a superb piece of software that wont break the budget.

Edited by baggywrinkle
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As your taking budget then I'd suggest second hand. Have s look at mbpphotographic.co uk. The prices look to be very good for used dslrs. I've used then a few times and not had any complaints.

Something to bear in mind, a dskr work work well for the moon with that scope, with something like eosmovierec I've heard it can be good for planetary, but the focal ratio of the skymax is to slow for deep sky unless you can track for very long exposures, where a dslr is not the best tool

Sent from my GT-I9300 using Tapatalk

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As your taking budget then I'd suggest second hand. Have s look at mbpphotographic.co uk. The prices look to be very good for used dslrs. I've used then a few times and not had any complaints. Something to bear in mind, a dskr work work well for the moon with that scope, with something like eosmovierec I've heard it can be good for planetary, but the focal ratio of the skymax is to slow for deep sky unless you can track for very long exposures, where a dslr is not the best tool Sent from my GT-I9300 using Tapatalk

What would you suggest for deep sky? 

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If you are on a budget have a look at:

http://www.camerapricebuster.co.uk

This is updated daily and gives lowest prices and comparisons for all brands of photographic equipment, and more importantly where to get those prices. I've used it successfully a few times now most recently for a brand new Canon 5D3 (and genuine UK stock not grey imports).

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If I were you, on a budget... and you want to do deepsky... I'd probably get a cheapy 2nd hand dSLR something like

http://www.mpbphotographic.co.uk/used-equipment/used-digital-slr-cameras/used-canon-digital-slr-cameras/canon-eos-450d/ for £159

and

http://www.mpbphotographic.co.uk/used-equipment/used-lenses/used-canon-fit-lenses/canon-ef-50mm-f/1.8-ii-1/ for  £64

a piece of dovetail bar from FLO for £14.90 

and mount the camera directly to the dovetail bar. Then, replace the scope with this setup. You ought to be able to get 30-40 second exposures anywhere in the sky with the AltAz mount, and the camera and lens combo will produce some nice widefields. That's still over £200, but you will get results. You could, at a later point add something like the ST80 (maybe again, second hand) to get that bit more focal length, although the optics on the ST80 will cause a few problems for imaging. 

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As already mentioned the Canon 450D is perfect for the job and available cheaply. My is astro modded and it makes a difference for deep sky though for solar system / lunar it wont matter.

Given your Mak the planets are your best choice particularly with an Alt-Az mount as deep sky really needs a faster scope and an accurate driven EQ mount to do DSO's justice.

alternate choice (on a budget) would be the 300D (no live view) as it's even cheaper or else the 1000D.

for planets have you considered a webcam with appropriate software, your set up would be perfect for that. I'd recommend a SPC800 / 900 as they are excellent value and easy to use.

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Duh, hey guys. (lost)

RichMedRev, you talking about the CLS clip filter?

And JGS said, "Something to bear in mind, a dskr work work well for the moon with that scope, with something like eosmovierec I've heard it can be good for planetary, but the focal ratio of the skymax is to slow for deep sky unless you can track for very long exposures, where a dslr is not the best tool"

Duh,  (really lost) I'm certain it's in another thread somewhere could you or someone explain (again :S) how the Canon 450D is ideal for DSOs vs planetary? I think you're going to say DSOs and that leads me to think the 450D is ideal for reflectors?

Don't mind me, I'm fine. (not really...) help.. :S

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You can take some nice pics of the moon through a small mak with a DSLR, because there is a lot of light to play with. The mak is just a big telephoto lens in this case.

DSLRs can also be used to photograph very dim objects like DSOs. For that to work you need an optically fast scope or lens (ideally F6 or less), not F13 like a mak. And you need to take long exposures even with a fast lens - which implies you need a good equatorial mount.

I don't know about eosmovierec, but for planetary photography you need to take hundreds of short exposures over a period of a couple of minutes, a so-called high frame rate camera. Then you can use software to build a sharp image from the short exposures, which are ALL blurry. DSLR video is typically compressed, which introduces artifacts, so DSLRs are not suited for planetary work. But perhaps eosmovierec has a way round that.

I want to learn more about eosmovierec too, and a quick google turned this up:

http://www.cloudynights.com/ubbthreads/showflat.php/Cat/0/Number/3894119/Main/3878307

The traditional way to get into planetary imaging is to mod a cheapo webcam, by the way. 

By the way, my avatar was shot with my NexStar 4SE (similar to the 127, but mine has an equatorial wedge), using long exposures with a DSLR. I used a camera lens and the 4SE mount, not the mak.

Edited by Ags
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You can take some nice pics of the moon through a small mak with a DSLR, because there is a lot of light to play with. The mak is just a big telephoto lens in this case.

DSLRs can also be used to photograph very dim objects like DSOs. For that to work you need an optically fast scope or lens (ideally F6 or less), not F13 like a mak. And you need to take long exposures even with a fast lens - which implies you need a good equatorial mount.

I don't know about eosmovierec, but for planetary photography you need to take hundreds of short exposures over a period of a couple of minutes, a so-called high frame rate camera. Then you can use software to build a sharp image from the short exposures, which are ALL blurry. DSLR video is typically compressed, which introduces artifacts, so DSLRs are not suited for planetary work. But perhaps eosmovierec has a way round that.

I want to learn more about eosmovierec too, and a quick google turned this up:

http://www.cloudynights.com/ubbthreads/showflat.php/Cat/0/Number/3894119/Main/3878307

The traditional way to get into planetary imaging is to mod a cheapo webcam, by the way. 

By the way, my avatar was shot with my NexStar 4SE (similar to the 127, but mine has an equatorial wedge), using long exposures with a DSLR. I used a camera lens and the 4SE mount, not the mak.

Sorry if I'm being a bit thick but what do you mean by an equatorial "wedge" ? 

Thanks!

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On an AZ mount, there are two axes of rotation - one of which points straight up into the sky, right angles to the ground. In order to track the motion of the sky for long exposures, that axis has to point at the pole star (assuming you are northern hemisphere) NOT straight up. A wedge does what it sounds like - it tilts the AZ mount so the 'straight up' axis is converted into a 'pole star' axis.

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If that mount you have is the one I think you have (same as the NexStar SLT) there won't be a wedge, and no way, without some modding, I don't know how much, to use one. The costs involved would probably make it more worthwhile to purchase a decent EQ mount in the first place. You don't need to, as you're on a tight budget, but you'll just need to determine the limits of the mount and get as close to them as you can. Realistically, this means that you should be able to achieve between 30 and 40 seconds, anywhere in the sky, up to about 2 minutes, low in the east and west. Although, at that sort of exposure length, you're going to lose a high proportion of frames to drive errors on the mount. (I was losing 50%).

eosmovierec apparently captures the liveview output directly as a video stream, and can use the liveview zoom to get 'in' closer. http://eos-movrec.sourceforge.net/

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You will need a standard Nikon T2 Ring to attach to your camera that's for sure, I am sure other members with reflector telescopes will give you further detail. This might also help http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cYTmsfpL0M4

Glad to see I am not the only member with a Nikon :smiley: We seem to be outnumbered by Canon's.

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Hi all, just a quick question...

I have a Skywatcher Skymax 127 on an Alt-Az mount. I would like to get some snaps with a DSLR but I'm on a very tight budget, any recommendations? New or Used!

Hello, what's the max budget for you?

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Nikon, Canon , Pentax and Sony all make fine cameras. The best thing you can do is go to a store and pick one in your price range.Before that, you can take a look here for some recommendation

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