Jump to content

Stargazers Lounge Uses Cookies

Like most websites, SGL uses cookies in order to deliver a secure, personalised service, to provide social media functions and to analyse our traffic. Continued use of SGL indicates your acceptance of our cookie policy.

sgl_imaging_challenge_banner_dslr_mirrorlesss.thumb.jpg.5b348d6a5e7f27bdcb79e9356b7fc03b.jpg

JB80

Heads up! Another big sunspot on the way?

Recommended Posts

A HUGE spot coming nicely into view in the latest SDO images :laugh: :laugh:

I think I will be clouded out today, but hope to see this big 'un tomorrow :cool:  I imagine Steve will be busy optimizing his new white light scope, testing it on birds in trees. etc. :p

Edited by Luke

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No he's laying in bed reading this ... :p 

Can't get a clear shot til around ten here ... looks like being a few gaps about ... :laugh:  

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Jeez there is two of them, it was only one last night when I posted this.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Looks like the Lunt solar wedge might get its first workout in the morning! :)

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes! New solar scope should arrive Monday to start getting a good look of this.

Excuse my ignorance but how long does it take for us to see a sunspot move across the disc face assuming we can't see it at highly tangential angles. Also do they disappear before moving across whole disc (I guess they are very active). I am new to this solar stuff!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes! New solar scope should arrive Monday to start getting a good look of this.

Excuse my ignorance but how long does it take for us to see a sunspot move across the disc face assuming we can't see it at highly tangential angles. Also do they disappear before moving across whole disc (I guess they are very active). I am new to this solar stuff!

No need to excuse yourself, they are good questions.

 Sunspots can move at different speeds so there is no set rule, well kind of, they move faster closer to the equator than they do further out on the disc. Normally and I'm guessing here but you have maybe a week for it to travel across.

One of the things you can do is chart the spots movement in grids across the sun and record them, I'm not sure if you can submit the data anywhere though.

And yes they can disappear in a matter of hours but then others can last for 100 days.

It's all quite fascinating.

I managed to catch a break in the clouds to get a few snaps so we'll see what I got a bit later.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

They take about 12 days to rotate across the disk if they are around the equator (a bit longer if they are further north or south). They can appear and disappear, and change, quite quickly - impossible to predict! That's what makes solar so interesting!

Helen

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the answers guys. Sounds like the window is 7-12 days then but the spots themselves are very dynamic.

I started trying to work it out myself by finding out how fast the sun rotated (27 days at equator - 31 days at poles), including the earth orbit, and then trying to find out if the earth orbit was in the same direction as the suns rotation. It turns out everything should rotate counterclockwise (Venus and Neptune being exceptions). At this point I decided it was too complicated and thought I would ask you guys for some practical experience.

I hope this one holds out until next weekend and that it isn't as cloudy as it is here now in Derby.

I can see why solar viewing is addictive and I haven't even started!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Conditions were poor here, but I had a go anyway seeing as there was such a nice spot on view!

I set up to image white light first, but adandoned the imaging. There was too much cloud, no way I would get that to stack, so I switched to visual with my ED80 and Herschel wedge. The view was poor, but it give me a feel for the size of the new spots and I was pleased to have seen the big spot :smiley:

The view with my hydrogen alpha scope was more successful, the big spot looked majestic, with some lovely filaments around it and some nice proms in the area. The view was still ropey, but it's whetted my appetite. Hope the clouds show some mercy tomorrow :grin:

Edited by Luke

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Clouded out completely today, so the wedge will have to wait... Trust!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.