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neck ache, back ache, oh my...questions please


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So, being very new to all this...I have a question. Is there a trick to being comfortable when out viewing? Or does one just "deal" with it. Was hoping some of you more experienced folk would have some suggestions.

Thanks in advance!

Mark

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In this case I believe the main issue for you will be using the finder scope? You'll have contort your body a bit in order to look through it...but have you considered a zero-mag finder such as an RDF? This will save you some hassle...Well, you'll need to bend over still, but won't have to kill yourself doing that like in the case of an optical finder scope.

Also like mentioned above, an adjustable seat is a necessity. I use a normal adjustable stool and it does the job quite well. You might as well fully extend the tripod legs, or increase the height of the scope.

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I bought myself one of these http://www.philipmorrisdirect.co.uk/leifheit-multiseat-niveau-ironing-chair/product/

it's an ironing chair but it is so good for observing, takes all

the strain from my back, neck and legs, it has great adjustment

up and down, you will find something similar in a hardware store.

That is a neat chair and much cheaper than the astro chairs......

As for the OP. Will your scope take a RA finder scope. Does it have a shoe that you can put one in?

That way you will not have to lay yoursefl over the barrell of the OTA and perform flapping movements to maintain balance...

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An adjustable chair or stool and a right angled finder will help big time if you have back or neck problems. I use an adjustable ironing chair which was under £20 off Amazon and an Orion RACI 9x50 finder scope which sits nicely on dobs, refractors, and cassegraines. You'll be amazed at the difference it makes being comfy at the eyepiece - makes a huge difference to your observing experience. :)

(If you're using a newtonian on an eq mount then also get rotating tube rings so you can easily spin the scope round to the best eyepiece position after slewing - or make your own like these:

http://www.andysshotglass.com/wilcox_rotating_rings.html

http://www.astro-baby.com/articles/rotating%20rings/Rotating%20Rings%20Project.htm )

Edited by brantuk
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I use a drummers throne (padded stool) these are fully adjustable for height and nice n comfy. Those ironing chairs would last about two minutes with a great lump like me on them. Drum stools are much stronger, they have to be ;)

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Get a comfortable, adjustable chair, and position the eyepiece so it is in a position where you don't have to bend your neck too much. This may mean rotating the tube in its rings for a Newt, or turning the diagonal in a frac or SCT. If you are using a frac and don't have a diagonal, get one. With a refractor you may want to consider getting a taller tripod than those usually supplied with the scopes. I built a 5' tall tripod for my 1000mm long refractor. This allows me to view the zenith while sitting on a low stool, rather than lying on the ground. A right angle finder also helps, as you don't have to twist into impossible contortions to see through it, especially when viewing things at high altitudes.

Taking a few Tylenol helps with the pain, too.

Edited by The Warthog
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Apart from the initial problem of aligning the scope you can rotate the diagonal so that you are always able to view at a comfortable position.  But an adjustable stool also helps.  I have a backless bar stool which works very well for most positions.  Also, as mentioned, a right-angled finderscope is also very useful but it can be a bit difficult to do the initial alignment with it.

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I bought myself one of these http://www.philipmorrisdirect.co.uk/leifheit-multiseat-niveau-ironing-chair/product/

it's an ironing chair but it is so good for observing, takes all

the strain from my back, neck and legs, it has great adjustment

up and down, you will find something similar in a hardware store.

great seat but the seat base is rubbish, about as strong as biscuit. I had a mate replace mine with some plyboard, took all of 5 minutes. Also have replaced the screw seat adjustrr bolt with a metalbar that has a bend at the end to lock it, makes it quicker to adjust the height.
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I just ordered two of these tables from Ikea for £5 each. I plan to stack them securly to give a 90cm high platform for my Skywatcher 130p Dob which will put my eyepiece at just about eye level and will give me the top of the lower table as a place to keep eyepieces, a cup of coffee or a glass of Malt :cool:

I have had these tables before. The legs screw off and on in seconds and they can be packed away flat and assembled in short order when you want to use them. They are also light weight but very sturdy.

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I figured out was hurting my back and neck. I ajusted the height of the tripod to make the eye piece slightly higher then eye height. Then I can tippy toe up or step on something. It was the view finder that hurt more craning your neck to see properly

Sent from my GT-I9505 using Tapatalk

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Old beaten up PC chairs are good ... They go up and and round and round ... Something to do in the cloudy bits :-)

Weeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee!

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