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TheWannabeAstronomer

I still cant seem to find Orion!

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I have noticed many users go by 3 stars that line up, and look under those stars, all I have seen were clusters of stars under there and very bright stars but none were the orion nebula, can anyone help?

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this is what you hould using binoculars, or a small scope. it is a naked eye object as well, just below the belt of orion

post-5271-0-09228800-1388208841_thumb.jp

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you can see Orions nebula with naked eye in even pretty heavy LP. If you look under his belt its going to look like a smudge in the sky or even to those with sharp eyes can make out some stars. In a small scope or binos it wont leave any doubt. Its looks faint green to me. Let your eyes get dark adapted my help too.

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I have noticed many users go by 3 stars that line up, and look under those stars, all I have seen were clusters of stars under there and very bright stars but none were the orion nebula, can anyone help?

Not quite sure what three stars you are referring to. The 3 brightest ones are the belt. Lowest on the left. Below the leftmost bright star is a series of what appears to be 3 stars in a sort of vertical line. Aim for the middle one. That should get you to the nebula.

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Just came in from looking at it. My scope is a 114 mm reflector. Look for three vertical stars much fainter than the three belt stars halfway between the belt and the two feet. The middle star is the one. In my scope it looks like a grey smudge around a few stars. If you relax your eye the nebula becomes clearer. with my 10mm eyepiece it looks pretty cool, no color though. Keep trying you will find it!  The darker the sky the better, I think tonight here in Minnesota was my best view of it yet. Can't wait to buy a 10 inch dob, hopefully this summer.  Good luck.

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This may help? As the others have described, find the three bright stars which form Orion's Belt. Below this are three dimmer stars in a row, running at a roughly 45 degree angle to the belt. The middle star of these three is the nebula.

Posted Image

Posted Image

Hope that helps.

Stu

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This may help? As the others have described, find the three bright stars which form Orion's Belt. Below this are three dimmer stars in a row, running at a roughly 45 degree angle to the belt. The middle star of these three is the nebula.

yquqe8a5.jpg

eryvujah.jpg

Hope that helps.

Stu

Great image!

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I'd also suggest getting a copy of "Turn Left At Orion".

I got a copy as one as my Christmas presents and I would highly recommend it.

Also Stellarium is a free downloadable program that is awesome to guide you through the night sky.

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This may help? As the others have described, find the three bright stars which form Orion's Belt. Below this are three dimmer stars in a row, running at a roughly 45 degree angle to the belt. The middle star of these three is the nebula.

yquqe8a5.jpg

eryvujah.jpg

Hope that helps.

Stu

Tidy!

Yep, it's his appendage (or scabbard) you're after, not his belt!

Cheers

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Good luck to-night, I'm sure with all the pointers above you'll get there.

Keep us posted.

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Looking forward to seeing this myself, thanks for the extra pointers. I knew it had a nebular, but finding it was a mystery. New telescope should help me out no end! :laugh:

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I was looking last night at a the nebula, first at about 7.30 then again at about 12 when it was much higher up in the south. What was interesting, and I shouldn't have been surprised, was how much bigger the spread of the nebula was apparent when higher and how easy it was to spot the trapezium.

Using a 120 mm refractor and it probably appeared best at about 40x with the 25mm eyepiece.

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Hi Everyone, I'm new to the forum and observing. I received a Celestron travelscope 70 for Christmas from my wife and have so far seen Jupiter + moons really clearly using it with 20mm eyepiece and 2x Barlow. I have never used a telescope before and this seems to be the perfect starting scope for lunar and planetary observing - We also live on a boat so being compact is a HUGE bonus!

Any way to cut to the chase! Do you guys think I could view the Orien Nebula with some detail with this telescope? i.e see any colour - we've had horrendous weather so I've not been able to give it whirl myself.

Many thanks.

P.S this forum is full of excellent info  :smiley:

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Hi Everyone, I'm new to the forum and observing. I received a Celestron travelscope 70 for Christmas from my wife and have so far seen Jupiter + moons really clearly using it with 20mm eyepiece and 2x Barlow. I have never used a telescope before and this seems to be the perfect starting scope for lunar and planetary observing - We also live on a boat so being compact is a HUGE bonus!

Any way to cut to the chase! Do you guys think I could view the Orien Nebula with some detail with this telescope? i.e see any colour - we've had horrendous weather so I've not been able to give it whirl myself.

Many thanks.

P.S this forum is full of excellent info  :smiley:

Welcome to SGL!

You should be able to see it with your scope. Probably won't be able to see much detail though. Even without color it is a pretty target to look at.

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The only colour you'll see is on planets and a few double stars. The eye isn't capable of seeing the colours in nebulae - the only way to pick that up is using long exposure cameras with filters. And most of the colour in nebulae is Ha (red) which isn't in the visible spectrum.

With a 70mm scope you'll definitely see the Orion nebula shape, and it will be a tad better than with 10x50 binoculars. Don't magnify it too much though or you'll only see the central part - it's beauty is in it's huge size and shape at low magnification - unless you are trying to split the Trapezium doubles.

If you don't have Stellarium then download it - it's free. You can judge Orion's position and even zoom into it so you'll be thoroughly familiar with what you're looking for. It's bigger than what you first see - you can follow faint nebulosity along one arm and it takes you round in a massive heart shape and back along the other arm - it's massive. :)

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Hi Everyone, I'm new to the forum and observing. I received a Celestron travelscope 70 for Christmas from my wife and have so far seen Jupiter + moons really clearly using it with 20mm eyepiece and 2x Barlow. I have never used a telescope before and this seems to be the perfect starting scope for lunar and planetary observing - We also live on a boat so being compact is a HUGE bonus!

Any way to cut to the chase! Do you guys think I could view the Orien Nebula with some detail with this telescope? i.e see any colour - we've had horrendous weather so I've not been able to give it whirl myself.

Many thanks.

P.S this forum is full of excellent info  :smiley:

Welcome to SGL! I had a 70mm scope, and the Orion nebula was quite easily visible, as a large fuzz.

David

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Also don't forget everything is upside down and back to front. My old brain has never got around this and I find myself going the wrong way still quite often. I look at a star chart and then look in the scope and find it totally different,,,,durrrr

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It should be easily visible, and with averted vision and a bit of practice I expect you'll see some shape.

I posted it in another thread, Messier's own sketch: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:M42m.jpg is worth seeing. He made it with a 4 inch refractor, albeit without much light pollution to worry about but then without any coatings on the optics either. The bright core (white on the sketch) more or less matches what I saw in my 3 inch reflector.

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Hi Everyone, I'm new to the forum and observing. I received a Celestron travelscope 70 for Christmas from my wife and have so far seen Jupiter + moons really clearly using it with 20mm eyepiece and 2x Barlow. I have never used a telescope before and this seems to be the perfect starting scope for lunar and planetary observing - We also live on a boat so being compact is a HUGE bonus!

Any way to cut to the chase! Do you guys think I could view the Orien Nebula with some detail with this telescope? i.e see any colour - we've had horrendous weather so I've not been able to give it whirl myself.

Many thanks.

P.S this forum is full of excellent info  :smiley:

My son has this scope and with a 2x Barlow and the 10mm eyepiece you can also see the Andromeda galaxy, as well as the Orion nebula, however, they are both faint and weren't coloured.

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