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Jupiter and Ganymede - (re-processed)


Barv
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Indeed, not so blue anymore ;). I believe you have brought out more detail too :). I do think Jupiter is further on the red side than the blue side, but less red than Mars.

Definitely an improvement :D

Edited by Naemeth
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Hi Barv - I've made a couple of extra comments in your other thread.....not wanting to disappoint you but rather wanting to assist your development in planetary imaging I have to say that your processing of this image in the other thread is a tad better because you've kept the noise (which appears as graininess) under control better.

There's always a tendency to try and drag more out of an image and when one tries this often they become grainy and "heavy" in appearance and artefacts such as the ring/rind within the planet's edge become more pronounce as it has above...in many folks opinion (including mine!) a more gentler application of sharpening produces a smoother, more pleasing and truer-to-life appearance!

It's always a quest to process as best each of us can for a "smooth, natural" appearance on any planet.....atm I'm "smoothing down" a Saturn image more as well as making it 600dpi because the BAA has asked me if they can use it on their poster for the 2014 European Astrofest, it being the first amateur image to reveal Saturn's North Polar hexagonal outline.....not my best by far but taken back in January of this year and historically significant because of this fact...

So when I agreed to do this for them I looked at the existing processed images on my hard drive and said "naaah! I ought to smoothen it up a bit more for them" you can see it is a problem we all revisit constantly.....you captured a fine image of Jove and if you keep on experimenting with processing as you continue to capture you will arrive at a sweet spot/regimen: keep up the good work! :)

Edited by Kokatha man
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Both your processes are good, personally I prefer the colour balance in this one but as Kokatha man says it is fairly noisy, can I ask did you stack the same amount of frames as your last image 1500? Personally I tend to stack between 3000 to 6000 frames per stacked image depending on seeing (with my colour DFK.. maybe a bit different to your ASI) which does help to reduce the noise in the final image although I'll be the first to admit I do have a tendency to over do the wavelets myself and it is a really fine line between more detail and noise! :smiley:    

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Both your processes are good, personally I prefer the colour balance in this one but as Kokatha man says it is fairly noisy, can I ask did you stack the same amount of frames as your last image 1500? Personally I tend to stack between 3000 to 6000 frames per stacked image depending on seeing (with my colour DFK.. maybe a bit different to your ASI) which does help to reduce the noise in the final image although I'll be the first to admit I do have a tendency to over do the wavelets myself and it is a really fine line between more detail and noise! :smiley:    

Hi Stev74 and thanks for the compliments. I did reduce the stack amount to try and bring more out of the image. I obviously overdid things a little though! I'm playing about with things at the moment and learning a lot. The American guys often prefer a slightly harder image I hear and I would think this is the case by both Kirscovitch's and SoulFrenzy's comments.

Thanks for your input! :smiley:

Harvey

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Hi Barv - I've made a couple of extra comments in your other thread.....not wanting to disappoint you but rather wanting to assist your development in planetary imaging I have to say that your processing of this image in the other thread is a tad better because you've kept the noise (which appears as graininess) under control better.

There's always a tendency to try and drag more out of an image and when one tries this often they become grainy and "heavy" in appearance and artefacts such as the ring/rind within the planet's edge become more pronounce as it has above...in many folks opinion (including mine!) a more gentler application of sharpening produces a smoother, more pleasing and truer-to-life appearance!

It's always a quest to process as best each of us can for a "smooth, natural" appearance on any planet.....atm I'm "smoothing down" a Saturn image more as well as making it 600dpi because the BAA has asked me if they can use it on their poster for the 2014 European Astrofest, it being the first amateur image to reveal Saturn's North Polar hexagonal outline.....not my best by far but taken back in January of this year and historically significant because of this fact...

So when I agreed to do this for them I looked at the existing processed images on my hard drive and said "naaah! I ought to smoothen it up a bit more for them" you can see it is a problem we all revisit constantly.....you captured a fine image of Jove and if you keep on experimenting with processing as you continue to capture you will arrive at a sweet spot/regimen: keep up the good work! :)

Thanks again Kokatha Man, I know you are the Man! I look forward to seeing that Saturn Image next year when you have finished playing! (My problem is I actually prefer the extended wavelet look! I guess my days as an imager are numbered! LOL).  :rolleyes:

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Very good definition. Which program did you use to process the image?

Brenda :)

Hi Brenda.

I stacked the image in AS2 and did the wavelets in Registax. Final touching up etc in Gimp.

Thanks

Harvey

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