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faulksy

newtonian colimation tools

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hi guys going to place a order with ts germany, but wondered what you reccomend the best tools are for colimation, i have read astro babys guide and this is great, do i just need a coli cap and cheshire or should i buy a colimatable laser instead of the cheshire. also what brands are good, thanks again

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You'll get lots views on this but this is my tuppence worth.

I'd get the cheshire first, and collimation cap if you want and laser later if you think you need one. I find the laser's really good for the fine tuning of the collimation. Even though I now have a laser I will never sell the cheshire.

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I use these two:

The 2" Concenter http://www.teleskop-express.de/shop/product_info.php/info/p5507_TS-Optics-Concenter-1-25--colimation-eyepiece-for-Newtonian-Telescopes.html

I use this to check the secondary, due to having concentric rings at the bottom of the tube, you can collimate the secondary without any problems, then I collimate the primary with one of these:

http://www.firstlightoptics.com/other-collimation-tools/premium-cheshire-collimating-eyepiece.html

or any chesire will do, don't have to be posh !

Al.

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I use a cheshire and laser . The cheshire for a first set up after strip down and the laser for fine tuning i the field.

To be honest the laser is the workhorse as i pop this in at the start of each session and it only takes about 1 minute to tune the scope.

Cheers

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I have both Cheshire and Baader Laser, the laser gets used ever time its easy and accurate night or day.....

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I use a colli cap for secondary and barlowed laser for primary very accurate

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I use these two:

The 2" Concenter http://www.teleskop-express.de/shop/product_info.php/info/p5507_TS-Optics-Concenter-1-25--colimation-eyepiece-for-Newtonian-Telescopes.html

I use this to check the secondary, due to having concentric rings at the bottom of the tube, you can collimate the secondary without any problems,

Al.

Interesting. Not come across these before. Anyone else tried them and any good reviews?

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looks interesting but for 58 euros I think Ill try to cobble something together myself. ie maybe print a set of concentric rings onto some acetate sheets and glue it to the bottom my cheshire. If I work out what the angular width is of the secondary when viewed through the cheshire then Im sure it will be possible to make a printed concentric circle onto some acetate to match the size and then fine tune the view by moving the focusser in and out until the circle overlies the view of the secondary 

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http://www.firstlightoptics.com/other-collimation-tools/baader-laser-collimator.html

I go with what some of the others above have said. I use a laser (as above) first but also have a cheshire to do a visual check as well.

however lets be honest here. Is the mark one, getting on a bit and wearings specs eyeball going to be more accurate than a precicion, machined scientific laser from a global manufacturer of high reputation? only a thought!

I have never had to alter after using laser then using cheshire sohhhh!

food for thought but for me laser is the new black ( or should that be collimation)

steve (or baz)

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Thanks guys I'll go with the laser then, do I still need a coli cap as well?

sent from my Sony Xperia

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While Lasers are no doubt handy and can produce quicker results than other methods, it is worth remembering that the laser has to be accurate in order to get accurate results back.

If you search for posts about laser collimators you will no doubt find many mentioning how they have had to first collimate their laser tool before suing it on their scope

So the assumption that lasers are always more accurate is not always true

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I don't think you can beat Hotech or the barlowed laser method when collimating a big newt. Trying to use a Cheshire in the dark is a pain and you cant adjust the primary when looking through it (unless your arms are 4ft long!).

I use a simple collimation cap to roughly make sure the secondary is centred then use a Hotech to fine tune the secondary and primary. Very easy and accurate for fast newts. 

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I use two tools. a standard cheap cheshire for secondary alignment and rough primary alignment and then a cheap and nasty chinese cheshire with no cross hairs for the final primary tweak. often I just use the latter.

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I do acknowledge Mike's comments about longer newts though. it's easily do-able but having someone to help is much easier.

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I used to use a Cheshire for my 12" and that wasn't too much problem because I could just point the scope towards the car interior light and collimate but with my current scope I'd have to be on all fours and you don't want to be mistaken as a sheep in Cornwall!  :grin:

Laser collimators work well as long as they are collimated themselves but I don't think there is a right or wrong tool for collimation its the end result that counts. :)

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I wouldnt use a laser to collimate the secondary mirror due to slop in many focussers primary yes secondary no

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I love it when someone asks which collimating tools they should get, it always ends up as a Cheshire Vs Laser thread.
 

Poor old newbs never know which way to turn.  But really the upshot is use what works for you.  If it is a laser then go with a laser but if you prefer a Cheshire (like me) then it won't let you down.
 

We are quite passionate about our collimation so we all have our own little ways, but no one will steer you wrong.

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Thanks guys I'll go with the laser then, do I still need a coli cap as well? sent from my Sony Xperia

If your Orion optics focuser is anything like mine there won't be any slop in it, mine holds its position very well as I rack it it in and out. As yours is second hand, its reasonable to assume the secondary will be in the correct position under the focuser already, so if you prefer the laser I think you'll be fine with it.

Edited by Scooot

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I bought a laser used it and thought my viewing wasn't that good checked with my Cheshire and was miles out. I have tried several times now to collimate the laser unsuccessfully can get it to a 1cm circle from 10ft away but not any better and that just wont do it in the scope it draws a circle around the do-nut., so i will stick to my Cheshire and in the dark use my red light torch with it. 

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