Jump to content

Banner.jpg.39bf5bb2e6bf87794d3e2a4b88f26f1b.jpg

NEW ASTERISM DISCOVERED? Need help...


mdstuart
 Share

Recommended Posts

Evening


I know some of you binocular observers love asterisms. Well here is a new one to me.


"Eddies coaster"


It's in Cassiopeia above Y. Here is an image for you with the rollercoaster marked in yellow. It does not always show well in atlases or photos but boy does it stand out in 10 x 50 mm binoculars!


post-1454-0-11009300-1386271825_thumb.gi


I am friends with Eddie Carpenter. He is an old guy who has observed the skies for decades. You know the sort. Always happy to help..has a big shed etc.


He is now ill and unless an operation goes ahead in December things are not promising.


He loves books and I would love to get his? asterism published somewhere for him. He has mentioned it along time ago to the RAS in the UK and to a Japanese Astro organisation but I do not think it has ever been in a book or magazine etc unless you lot know otherwise?


Anyway I was thinking. Perhaps someone out their could take an image of it and then I could get it framed etc for him for Christmas?


Perhaps Steve T , you could put it in one of your books?


I have also asked Sue French to see if she can get it in Sky and telescope.


Please go out and observe it for Eddie! Tell me what you think.


Mark


P.S If it already a well known asterism then so be it but to me it will always be Eddies coaster!


  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Perhaps Steve T , you could put it in one of your books?

Only just done a new edition, so it will be several years till the next one (if there is one). However, I have another idea (but it won't happen for a few months) -- I'll let you know if it comes off. (And yes, I love asterisms!)

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

The asterism is mainly made up of F and G main sequence stars a few hundred light years away in the Perseus arm of our galaxy.

There are three supergiants though, one of which is over 30,000 ly away. This supergiant HD6474 is a UU variable with two periods of variability that overlap. This star is way out on the edge of the milky way plan in the outer arm.

One star HD4994 is listed as a multiple star.

Amazing what you can find out these days from a string of stars..

Mark

Sent from my BlackBerry 9320 using Tapatalk

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm very sorry to hear Eddie is unwell and please pass on my best wishes to him the next time you see him. We first meet years ago, he is the father in law of an old boss of mine and we would often talk astronomy when he popped into the lab in Cheltenham while his wife Jackie went shopping. He's definitely one of a kind and the next time I'm out imaging I'll try and spot "Eddies Coaster" and wish him well.

Mel Gigg

Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sorry to hear that Eddie's not well Mark. His 'magic lantern' talks using 100 year old slides and an electrified carbide projector are fantastic. 

I've just have a quick squint about outside with a pair of 8x56mm and you are right, Eddie's Coaster is a nice ribbon of stars. Up on end at the moment though!

Please send him my regards and I hope all goes well and he gets better soon. Please also let him know that 8th December is the 105th anniversary of first light of the 60 inch Mt. Wilson telescope.

Rik McRae

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Rik and Mel

Messages passed on.

Does anyone have the triion atlas 2000 that can tell me which page the asterism is on? See below!

I am the owner of the SAC Asterisms database and I have received some

information about "Eddie's Coaster".  Please answer the questions below

and I can fill in the data to include it in the database.

Here is what I have so far:  Constellation-CAS,  Observing-10X50

binoculars, Notes-a curved chain of about 15 stars 8 to 10 magnitude

(estimated off photo), that look like a roller coaster.

I need:

Size in degrees or arcminutes

Center RA and Dec (can be estimated off a planetarium program)

On which chart in the Triion Atlas 2000 it will appear

That will allow me to include the asterism, I will let you know when it

is available.

Clear skies;

Steve Coe

Sent from my BlackBerry 9320 using Tapatalk

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Evening
I know some of you binocular observers love asterisms. Well here is a new one to me.
"Eddies coaster"
It's in Cassiopeia above Y. Here is an image for you with the rollercoaster marked in yellow. It does not always show well in atlases or photos but boy does it stand out in 10 x 50 mm binoculars!
I am friends with Eddie Carpenter. He is an old guy who has observed the skies for decades. You know the sort. Always happy to help..has a big shed etc.
He is now ill and unless an operation goes ahead in December things are not promising.
He loves books and I would love to get his? asterism published somewhere for him. He has mentioned it along time ago to the RAS in the UK and to a Japanese Astro organisation but I do not think it has ever been in a book or magazine etc unless you lot know otherwise?
Anyway I was thinking. Perhaps someone out their could take an image of it and then I could get it framed etc for him for Christmas?
Perhaps Steve T , you could put it in one of your books?
I have also asked Sue French to see if she can get it in Sky and telescope.
Please go out and observe it for Eddie! Tell me what you think.
Mark
P.S If it already a well known asterism then so be it but to me it will always be Eddies coaster!

I'll have a pop when the moon's gone.

Olly

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Very nice thought, and a lovely looking asterism.

It shows up reasonably well on SkySafari, set to show down to mag 8.8 in this case. Should be framed very well in a 4.5 degree fov (shown).

post-6762-138666268787_thumb.jpg

Will have a look next time I'm out.

Cheers,

Stu

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue. By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.