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Hello All,

Returning to astro after a break. Is this moon filter any good?

http://www.amazon.co.uk/New-2012-Crystalview-telescope-eyepiece/dp/B00A6PASTC/ref=sr_1_4?ie=UTF8&qid=1385415694&sr=8-4&keywords=moon+filter+for+telescope

I had a cheaper one which was awful, I don't want to be blinded; if not this could someone recommend an alternative?

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The only time you may need/want a Moon filter is when the Moon is full. However when it is full, there is almost no contrast in detail so you dont need one (its not really worth observing it when full) . You will/can not be blinded physically by Moon light.

I say forget about buying a Moon filter. Buy yourself a light pollution filter (if LP is an issue) or maybe a UHC or an OIII filter for observing nebulae.

Moon filters really are just not needed by anyone.

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Thanks, didn't mean literally blinded!!

I know what you mean. When i went from a 130mm scope to a 200mm scope, it kind of did feel like i was literally being blinded by Moonlight.

Its a question that beginners ask. They think the light from the Moon may cause damage to their eyes.

It doesnt and never can.

Edited by LukeSkywatcher
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Hi Steve, I prefer to use a Moon filter myself as i find the Moon quite bright.  Always go to a decent astronomy retailer when buying astro-gear.  I find Neutral Density filters the best, if you go for a ND96 0.9, that will give you 13% light transmission.  An ND96 0.6 will give you 25% light transmission.  I prefer the 13%, with the light reduced you can see more detail and more contrast in my opnion, but all astronomers are divided over thier usefulness, I prefer to use them myself.  On the Ostara one, I have not heard good reports on them, something about the thread being a bit soft and does not screw in very well to the eyepiece, but I have not tried one.  At the end of the day, you get what you pay for.  I prefer the Lumicon or Baader moon filters, but they are a bit more expensive, but well worth it for me personally.

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Hi Steve,

Im using this variable polarising filter for moon observations:
http://www.firstlightoptics.com/moon-neutral-density-filters/variable-polarizing-moon-filter.html

Dont have a lot of experience with filters so cant compare it to anything else but it does let me observe the moon without stressing my eyes.  Even with a full moon there are always some craters near the terminator which are interesting, so this works a treat for me. Also allowed some afocal with my smartphone... ( not good results but due to focus, technique etc rather than over exposure ) going to try my webcam next clear night.

One thing though,  when split only one set of threads fit my EP's / barlow. (Cant put one on the barlow and one on the ep to vary the polarisation by rotating the ep) So have to use both parts together. Not a major problem for me though, just attach it to the EP, roughly adjust it while pointing it at the moon then drop it in the focuser barrel. 

(When i put one part on the EP then just sit the other part in the EP cup I get a purple or yellow moon... :)  )

Hope this helps.

Cheers

Mark

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I bought a slightly different unbranded one from Amazon, and the threads stripped.

Never again.

Since then I have bought an ND96-0.6 (25%), and a ND96-0.9 (13%) from Ebay - better quality and only £2.30p each.

http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/ONE-High-Quality-1-25-Neutral-Density-Filter-for-Telescopes-3-Choices-50-/141122538573?pt=UK_Photography_Telescopes&hash=item20db8f0c4d#ht_3874wt_943

Wait for one where no-one else has bid yet.

I use the 25% transmission filter on the smaller 3" scope

And the 13% filter on the 200p due to it's massive ability to capture of light.

The blurryness in one eye from looking at the bright light can't be doing my eyesight any good.

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Oooops

50p plus £2.30p postage  = £2.80p per filter

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thanks guys, may go for the Baadar because it does do my eyes a bit!!

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I was recommended to buy a neutral density filter when I started, used it a couple of times and now it just sits in my eyepiece case.

I read on another thread some time ago about using sun-glasses, seems a reasonable idea but I haven't tried it.

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The rubbish one from Amazon is actually quite a good filter for Jupiter.

Weak as water with a slight purple tint, it was too weak for the moon.

But OK to take the glare off smaller objects when needed.

If I went for only one - it would be the variable polarised version so you can tune it in to the conditions on the night.

The 3-filters I have all get used, and cost less than £20 for the lot.

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I bought one from ebay,a blue tint one,hardly made any difference,still get a white spot in my eye for a good 10mins afterwards,may try sunglasses next time

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Hello All,

Returning to astro after a break. Is this moon filter any good?

http://www.amazon.co.uk/New-2012-Crystalview-telescope-eyepiece/dp/B00A6PASTC/ref=sr_1_4?ie=UTF8&qid=1385415694&sr=8-4&keywords=moon+filter+for+telescope

I had a cheaper one which was awful, I don't want to be blinded; if not this could someone recommend an alternative?

Notice how the seller is unashamedly  using another shops image and description . Nice advert for Lincs Optics though

Edited by NGC404

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Ah so they are!! I glanced over that!! thanks guys, I also bought a cheap one & the difference was hardly there, just a little shade off!!

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Try observing the full moon with outside lights on, you won't notice the harsh effects as much as when you are dark adapted.

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Hi Steve, I use a variable polarising filter, I can vary the light transmission - as the moon gets bigger (brighter) i can adjust it, i use it in the diagonal on the back of the CPC, I have a 2 inch star diagonal - I screw 1 2 " polarising filter in the side of the diagonal that pushes into the scope, on the end of the EP (1.25 or 2") I screw the other 1 in, so all i have to do is rotate the EP to adjust the amount of incoming light - also used on Jupiter/Saturn/Mars, as they can be very bright in the scope - it just takes the edge off the glare, for me, it really helps when I spend a long time just observing  each planet for long periods.  You can only do this when a star diagonal is used in the SCT or Frac though, a lot of people don't use filters of any kind when observing the Moon/Planets - I've always used them and seem to get on really well with them - but each to his own - Paul.

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thanks for this guys, I did once use shades for Jupiter & it worked; maybe a variable would be good on planets too. Interesting point about outside lights!

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thanks for this guys, I did once use shades for Jupiter & it worked; maybe a variable would be good on planets too. Interesting point about outside lights!

Hi Steve,

I agree. I find my variable filter 'works ok!' when observing Venus & Jupiter when it is dark :icon_salut:

I have not tried on Saturn, so I doubt it be of any use. :iamwithstupid:

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