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Alignment


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It seems to be UCAC4-461-005908

Information from catalog: 4UC
UCAC4
Visual magnitude: 12.61
Colour index: 0.98
Proper motion in right ascension: 9 [mas/y]
Proper motion in declination: -4 [mas/y]
flags: 0

Coordinates: Apparent
Apparent RA: 04h06m00.281s DE:+02?06'00.22"
Mean of the date RA: 04h05m58.350s DE:+02?06'02.00"
Astrometric J2000 RA: 04h05m14.990s DE:+02?03'48.58"
Ecliptic L: +59?50'01" B:-18?24'03"
Galactic L: +188?51'02" B:-34?59'32"

That's from the CdC version of UCAC4.

It will be a challenge seeing that visually with even a 10" scope but would be quite easy to get an image of it.

Chris
 

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Im hoping within the next few weeks I'll get some decent time to go out on the moors to actually get comfortable with alignment and try finding a few easy objects and then once im competent with that I'll move to more difficult ones amd find what I can amd can't do with the current scope and eventually upgrade when I have saved up, the main objective now though is to become proficient in using my less ideal equipment amd then when I move on to ideal equipmemt which I'll have the skills needed to go even further. I sort of get the kick out of the challenge of making do with what I have and become the best I possibly can with that :) keep motivated everybody! You all give me good advice and inspiration and help me along this new path which is also giving me the boost and fuelling my thirst for what ever the skies have out there which I never would have thought about a few months ago :)

Sent from my GT-I9505 using Tapatalk

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it's in the constellation of taurus. Coordinates are RA4h5m14.99s D2°3'49.47" please let me know if you find it. Its the one circled in red on the star map

Hi Sam,

thanks for that but I guess I might have a problem locating it since I only have a 6" Newt, no goto and restricted views from my garden. I'll try perhaps the next time I'm out with a friend in the field cuz he's got a 16" dob which is much more like it but heaven alone (literally) knows when that will be.

Like you I am not racing to get the biggest, fastest, all sigin' 'n' dancin' scope with all the bells and whistles. I too see it as a challenge to see how far I can go with my modest set up and learning as I go along. There are more than enough sights out there within reach of my scopes and bins to last me the rest of my life probably I guess with the universe we really are spoilt for choice.

Kind regaqrds

Roger

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Im not really up on the types of telescopes. So can you could you set me straight please. My scope is a celestron 5" reflector scope power seeker 127eq. Is this a newtonian type scope?

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Hi Sam,

yes your scope is a Newtonian on an EQ (equatorial) mount.

The main mirror at the bottom of the scope is 5" in diameter (=127mm) and there is a secondary mirror near the open end at an angle which reflects light from the main mirror into the eyepiece. This is the usual configuration for Newtonians named after Newton who invented this type of telescope. It is a reflector because it reflects the light into the eyepiece via mirrors whereas a refractor scope uses one or more lenses to focus the light into the eyepiece - refractors are typically physically longer than Newtonians of equivalent focal length.

Your telescope has a focal length of 1000mm and so could be referred to as a 127/1000 Newtonian.

Hope this helps.

Kind regards

Roger

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I somehow understood all thebsizes etc I even seem to understand magnification as well. But scope types I don't really know.

Thanks alot though Roger its great having people like yourself who are able to give even thougg smallest bits of info and answer any question that comes to mind

Sent from my GT-I9505 using Tapatalk

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