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adamnic85

Eye Pieces for viewing

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Hello all,

I have three eye pieces 25mm, 10mm and 4mm I also have a 2x Barlow lens what is the best combination to use to view planets or close galaxies or nebula?

thanks

Adam

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Welcome to SGL Adam - which scope do you have? Eyepiece choice is highly dependent the type of scope you use as well as personal preferences.

Generally though, to view planets you'll get nice views at around 150x to 200x magnification on a clear night with good transparency. To view galaxies like Andromeda, a low power wide field eyepiece gives the most satisfying views - I use around 50x magnification for that, and somewhere around 80x to 100x  for nebulae like M42. Hth :)

Edited by brantuk
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The best answer is the one that gives you the best clarity on the object.

It may help if you were to mention what scope you are using them with and which eyepieces they are.

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When you find your object, look at it first through the 25mm, then the 10mm. If it looks like it could still take more power then use the 4mm. If that's too much, you might want to try the 10mm with Barlow. In other words start low and work up until there's nothing more to be gained - no matter what scope you use.

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Welcome to SGL Adam - which scope do you have? Eyepiece choice is highly dependent the type of scope you use as well as personal preferences.

Generally though, to view planets you'll get nice views at around 150x to 200x magnification on a clear night with good transparency. To view galaxies like Andromeda, a low power wide field eyepiece gives the most satisfying views - I use around 50x magnification for that, and somewhere around 80x to 100x  for nebulae like M42. Hth :)

Yeah, it's tempting to wanna make the planets bigger, but I often can't get above this even for the moon (though this becomes more of a seeing issue). As Brantuk says, it takes special nights to pump up the mag much past 200x, no matter what size your scope. Most nights we're happy to use an 11mm at around 250x (if we can...sometimes we can't even get there. Living by the coast can have its drawbacks).

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Need to know the scope that you have but I have found that a 4mm especially if a plossl is usually a poor choice. Tempting, and yes I did it, but really a waste of time. The TMB's are better so if one of them it may be usable. Welham Green is close to Hertford and Alan of StL goes there so there seems the chance that the 4mm may be a TMB.

For planets it will depend on the planet. Jupiter is OK at 60x and 80x, for Saturn you need something around 120x, for Mars you need 200x, preferably 250x or more and throw in a good amount of luck also.

Unless the scope is up around the 200P size then seeing Mars in any detail will remain difficult.

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