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Collimation and Star-hopping


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In your Locating Objects... doc you have a very good tip in the form of a Finder window Card and I see a Ring binder Star chart that looks detailed and clear. I use a number of books I have but none are dediacted Star charts. I wondered what this one you use is called?  Also, related to your 5 degree finder window, is there an easy way of making the finder window(s) match my view from my 25mm and 12mm and 5.5mm (barlow view)? Where like you if I'm using the 12mm then I'd use the specific '12mm' finder so that I can get a better idea of where I am? If this makes sense?

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I don't profess to be either an expert or an expert speaker but was asked to do a couple of talks at the Peak Star Party recently. I have attached below my written handout notes for each session in th

Prompted by this post, I have adjusted the secondary mirror and achieved a much better focus. I didn't want to mess with the original factory settings on the brand new scope (although Fed-Ex may have 

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the main chart in the notes is the sky and telescope pocket sky atlas. very good and quite cheap too.

to create different ones for different eyepieces might be a little worthless really as if you create an e.g. 1 degree one it would have hardly any stars in at such resolution. for that you'd need more detailed maps. the good thing about the atlas above  is that is closely matches what you see in a 9x50 or 6x30 optical finder.

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Awesome guide John! I just received my Chershire, and after using it was wondering why my secondary mirror holder was oblong(like in the last picture of your guide). I am glad to hear that I actually did it properly and that it is normal! 

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I just found this thread and read both the PDF files. Collimation is not something i spend too much time doing or even worrying about but the file was a really good informative read. I loved the other file about locating objects. Having spent the best part of 30 yrs locating objects under my own steam, i must agree and have said it before that most of the fun of star hopping is "The Hunt". 

Well done Shane. 

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I don't profess to be either an expert or an expert speaker but was asked to do a couple of talks at the Peak Star Party recently.

I have attached below my written handout notes for each session in the hope they will help the odd person with how to find objects in the sky and also how to ensure you get the best views when you do find them. These notes are based on my own experience and also information gleaned from many sources since I started observing; thanks to anyone who recognises their work or comments.

If one person finds them useful then I'll be delighted and it's been worth the minor effort uploading them. They have been put into a couple of other threads but I felt they were somewhat hidden and might be more easily located here.

Cheers

Shane

attachicon.gifLocating Objects in the Night Sky.pdf

attachicon.gifCollimation of Newtonian Telescopes-1.pdf

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Thanks for this Shane, I am a newbie with a new skywatcher 200 dob and was looking to purchase some new lenses, but after reading the documents will now look to buy a collimator first.. It has put me on the right track,

Thanks

Nick

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I was actually attempting to collimation my secondary this evening, only for the second time, and I couldn't remember what I was so supposed to be aligning.

Now having read your collimation article the process seems much clearer now and have a much better idea of what I'm supposed to be doing. Many thanks.

Paul

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Your collimation paper has been added to my growing collection of how-to guides. Yours is one of the best - congratulations! Most of them leave people's eyes spinning around. You'd think it was instructions for the Manhatten Project.

All the best -

Dave

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Thanks very much Shane. Like many beginners I find getting the object you are looking for in the finder scope is the hardest part. I can recognise with the naked eye but when I look through the finds cope there are just so many stars visible that I can' work out which is the one I am looking for. Looks like an RDI needs to be on my birthday present list!

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