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Moonshane

Collimation and Star-hopping

59 posts in this topic

On the topic of finding stuff, I have had some problems. My binoculars seems to work well with star hopping even just waving around until the wanted object comes into view. I have then found a problem using the finder scope (90 degree right way up) or my camera to locate the object. I have just acquired a green laser pointer and that actually seems to do the business reliably. I have used it fixed on a tripod and adjusted it to point at what I can see in the binoculars and them it's easy to find the green beam (and hence the wanted object) in the finder scope. 

I know there can be problems with passing aircraft but it only takes a minute to do the procedure and the risk is very small as I am looking at the sky when it's on. What are the views of other members? It seems a very reliable method.

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Reasonably okay if used safely on your own but won't make many friends at star parties!

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great read! thanks for that. Have you got any additional tips for anyone ( by anyone I mean me) that doesn't have a finder scope but uses a telrad alone? I know most people use both but cant afford to (be caught..) spending any more on the scope for a good while yet.

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1 hour ago, popeye85 said:

great read! thanks for that. Have you got any additional tips for anyone ( by anyone I mean me) that doesn't have a finder scope but uses a telrad alone? I know most people use both but cant afford to (be caught..) spending any more on the scope for a good while yet.

I used to use just a Telrad / Red dot finder.

With a Telrad it's very useful to have a star chart and to make an acetate overlay with the 4, 2 and .5 degree circles of the Telrad marked on it. You can then overlay that onto the star field where your target lies and get a good idea of reasonably bright stars that you can position within the Telrad rings and note where your target object will be in relation to them.

 

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On Tuesday, October 22, 2013 at 05:24, Moonshane said:

I don't profess to be either an expert or an expert speaker but was asked to do a couple of talks at the Peak Star Party recently.

I have attached below my written handout notes for each session in the hope they will help the odd person with how to find objects in the sky and also how to ensure you get the best views when you do find them. These notes are based on my own experience and also information gleaned from many sources since I started observing; thanks to anyone who recognises their work or comments.

If one person finds them useful then I'll be delighted and it's been worth the minor effort uploading them. They have been put into a couple of other threads but I felt they were somewhat hidden and might be more easily located here.

Cheers

Shane

Locating Objects in the Night Sky.pdf

Collimation of Newtonian Telescopes-1.pdf

 


This post has been promoted to an article

 

Just wanted to say thank you very much! Downloaded both pdfs and looking forward to getting the star atlas for future sessions. 

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I got given a laser collimator for Crimbo and have read the guide in the OP as the instructions with the collimating device seemed a bit frightening.  The instructions in the OP are well written and understandable, but I still don't like the sound of shift screws around and potentially remove mirrors etc. that every set of instructions seems to come with.  Things like checking the distance on the vanes I can probably cope with, but anything that refers to doing any job with mirrors etc. fills me with dread that I could never get them back into place again.

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If you can adjust it wrong you (or a friend) can adjust It right. Just don't drop anything :headbang:

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Hi Moonshane, I'm sure that would be the case, but I don't have any friends and certainly haven't an inkling of anyone with telescope knowledge.  In terms of not dropping anything (in partic. that secondary mirror) is there anything on a telescope with are likely to be very shallowly screw threaded?

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The main danger Is the central bolt but this might not even need adjustment.  The other is dropping your Allen key but work other than vertical and you'll be fine

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