Jump to content

Stargazers Lounge Uses Cookies

Like most websites, SGL uses cookies in order to deliver a secure, personalised service, to provide social media functions and to analyse our traffic. Continued use of SGL indicates your acceptance of our cookie policy.

sgl_imaging_challenge_banner_dslr_mirrorlesss_winners.thumb.jpg.9deb4a8db27e7485a7bb99d98667c94e.jpg

Grinde

NGC 6992 - East Veil with the AG12

Recommended Posts

How's going people?

Long time since last post due to bright Swedish summer nights, gear-tuning and automation fiddling, but now I'm up & running again.

I'm starting off the dark season with one of my favorite targets inside the cygnus loop, NGC 6992, east veil nebula.

The subs where acquired during three moonlit nights, all subs unguided.

(shooting other targets too, so subs are shot when the target is in the highest position in the sky, thanks to ACP automation)

I've only used two filters for this image, Ha & O3 (both 5nm). I mixed the color close to Ha/O3/O3 as R/G/B , with slight different weights in G & B, to reach a more blue tone rather than cyan. Both Ha & O3 was used as luminance-data.

I also created a "natural" star-color mix of the layers, with Ha / Ha+O3 / O3 as R/G/B and adjusted filterweights until I had a natural mix of yellow & blue (go Sweden!) stars, which was later applied as color-data with a star-mask on top of the image.

The Subs (unguided):

Ha : 19 x 600s / 190 minutes

O3 : 12 x 600s / 120 minutes

Total time: 310 minutes / 5.2 hours

The Scope:
Orion Optics AG12
Aperture: 12"
Focal lenght: 1140mm
Focal ratio: f/3.8
Imaging scale: 0.98" / pixel together with my QSI 583

The Mount:
10 Micron GM 2000 HPS
All subs unguided

The Camera:
QSI 583 wsg (with 8-position filterwheel upgrade)
Filters: Astrodon
 

Click image for full resolution:

Med_95.jpg

It's been so much fun to see this object in the high resolution my setup produces, so many faint formations of nebulosity I've never seen before.

I also recommend to have a peek at the following link, it's crazy how different the same object can look, imaged through different wavelengths:

Click here to see the difference between the Ha & O3 at my homepage, with a "mouse-over" function that switches between the two

Thanks a lot for watching

Best Regards

Jonas Grinde

http://www.grinderphoto.se

  • Like 9

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That is quite literally spectacular!  Unguided too....excellent!  How on earth have you managed to resolve this so well - it's almost like a near earth object!

More please ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That is quite literally spectacular! Unguided too....excellent! How on earth have you managed to resolve this so well - it's almost like a near earth object!

More please ;)

Thanks mate!

I'm surprised myself by all the faint stuff showing, even though I havent got 'that' much data, & the subs weren't that long either. I'd say there's no substitute for good tracking, that's where the resolution comes from. Seeing in the range of 3"-3.5", nothing spectacular there.

And yes, more is on the way :-)

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Neither Grinde nor I have guided since we got our GM2000 mounts :) No need....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've commented eleswhere but this is fantastic. Sharp but delicate, softly processed because the data is inherently tack sharp. This is very obvious. You're still a young man, Jonas. I think you should settle down and do the whole Cygnus loop!!! DOn't take too long or I won't live to see it!  :grin:

A GM2000 represents about a year's income for me. I guide!

Olly

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Jonas,

That is a very detailed and deep image. When I look at the full size image I can't help but notice your stars are not 100% round.

Perhaps your primary mirror is pinched and needs to breathe a bit more in the cell?

But great image in any case.

Pieter

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Stunning wow !

The image is so smooth it really gives that 'fluffy' appearance, colour is very pleasing as are the stars.

I can see what Pieter is asking as well, the stars do seem to have a very slight pintched outward travelling effect on the mid left side, any idea what causes this ?

That kit certainly delivers some amaing data, well done.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • Similar Content

    • By f33n3y
      Hi everyone,
      Here is the Eastern Veil Nebula (NGC 6992/5), part of a large supernova remnant found in the constellation of Cygnus. You are looking at the wispy leftovers of a star 20 times more massive than our sun which exploded some 8000 years ago.
      Equipment:
      - Sky-Watcher 200PDS telescope
      - HEQ5 Pro mount
      - ZWO ASI1600MM camera for capture
      - ZWO filter wheel, Ha and Oiii filters
      - ZWO 120MM camera for autoguiding
      - ZWO finder-guider guidescope
      - Artesky flats box
      Acquisition:
      - 6th September 2019 from my garden in Glasgow, Scotland.
      - 50x120sec with Ha filter, unity gain
      - 50x120sec with Oiii filter, unity gain
      - 20 flats each filter and 20 darks
      - Controlled using Sequence Generator Pro
      Processing:
      - Stacked in Deep Sky Stacker
      - PixInsight dynamic crop, dynamic background extraction, pixelmath (to produce bicolour HOO image), colour calibration, SCNR, histogram transformation, curved transformation, star mask and star reduction, TGV denoise
      - Final denoise with Topaz Denoise and some touch ups in Lightroom.
      Future improvements:
      - More time on the target (less clouds).
      - Addition of comma corrector to my imaging train.
      - Create mosaic of the wider Veil nebula area.
      - Improve PixInsight processing workflow.
      More shots:
      https://www.instagram.com/glasgowastro

    • By Star101
      Taken last night, using TS65EQ  and Mono ASI 183mm pro.
      15 x 300  Astrodon 3mm Ha
      12 x 300 Astrodon 3mm OIII
      Mesu 200
      Guide using ZWO OAG and Lodestar x2 with PHD2
      SGPro
      Processed in Pixinsight . Output as HOO image.
      Thanks for looking
       

    • By Xiga
      Hi guys
      After processing the Eastern & Wastern Veils separately a couple of months back, I've finally got round to doing the mosaic that was always the end goal (hence the framing of each panel). I'm not sure why I waited so long to do it, I think deep-down I was secretly dreading it really, as this is my first mosaic so I wasn't really sure how it would go.
      So this is just 2 panels, and each one has 5 hrs of Ha (15 x 1200s), with 3 hrs 20 mins of Oiii in one (10 x 1200s) and 3 hrs 40 mins of Oiii (11 x 1200s) in the other. So 17 hrs in total.
      APP was used for stacking, gradient reduction, and the mosaic creation. PS used for everything else.
      Ha assigned to Red, Oiii to Blue, and Green was synthesized from one of Carboni's actions.
      I've tried to push it as far as I dare to, did I over-do it do you think? I've resized it down to 66% to help hide some of the noise, and being a mosaic it's still plenty big. I might even end up bringing it down to 50%, we'll see.
      C&C welcome as always. I tend to finish my images very late at night, so I can sometimes fall into the trap of not seeing the image as clearly as I should! So feel free to be as harsh as you like ?
       

    • By steppenwolf
      Pickering’s Triangle (Seimis 3-188)
      It is a little early in the season to be imaging this object as it didn’t appear above my local horizon until 00:50 when I started the project earlier this month but with nights getting shorter as we approach the summer solstice, it made sense to make an early start even though it took several nights to capture the data while ducking and diving between the clouds and early morning mist!
      Discovery
      Pickering’s Triangle is part of the supernova remnant known as The Veil Nebula in Cygnus. The Veil Nebula itself was discovered by William Herschel in September, 1784 but this faint region was only later discovered photographically in 1904 by Williamina Fleming at the Harvard Observatory. The discovery was made post publication of the New General Catalogue (NGC) so it isn’t included in the catalogue. Although it wouldn’t happen today (I hope!), the custom of the time was to credit the discovery to the lead astronomer, in this case Edward Charles Pickering, the director of the observatory.

      Image Stats

      Mount: Mesu 200
      Telescope: Sky-Watcher Esprit 150
      Flattener: Sky-Watcher Esprit specific
      Camera: QSI 683 WSG-8
      Filter: Astrodon 3nm Ha and 3nm OIII
      Subframes: 6 x 1800 sec Ha, 13 x 1800 sec OIII
      Integration: 9.5 hours
      Control: CCD Commander
      Capture: MaxIm DL
      Calibration, Stacking and Deconvolution: PixInsight
      Post-Processing: PhotoShop PS3
      Description
      The nebula can be found in the north-west quadrant of the Veil Nebula near NGC 6974 and 79 (see whole Veil Nebula image below). Lying around 1,400 light years away, the beautiful filamentary elements are the expanding shock-wave from the progenitor star that went supernova here somewhere between 5,000 and 10,000 years ago.

      Position within the Veil Nebula

      Visually, the nebula responds well to the use of an OIII filter as the region is rich in OIII emissions as can be seen in the blue/green filaments in the above images.
      Photographically this is a wonderful object that responds well to both LRGB and narrowband imaging and the example shown here was captured using Ha and OIII filters. Although there are sulphur emissions (SII) in this region, this object responds well to my favourite imaging method of 'bi-colour’. This process uses just Ha and OIII filtration wherein the OIII data is mapped to both the ‘Green’ and ‘Blue’ channels and the Ha is mapped to the ‘Red’ channel. The greyscale  images below show the individual Ha (left) and OIII (right) images used to produce this image. As you can see from the 'Stats' above, I have a whole load more Ha to collect to complete the image!
      The individual Ha and OIII images

       
    • By Hayduke27
      I made it out to my dark site on Friday evening, a few high wispy clouds in the sky but for the most part it was quite nice out.  The moon was already low and near setting, and I had just received my new Astronomik OIII filter, so I decided to try and find a few objects that have given me fits from the get-go.  I started the night taking a long hard look at the double cluster, something I only recently discovered, and then swung the scope around to Albireo, another newer sight for me. 
       
      After getting my eyes full of stars, I affixed the filter to my ES 30MM 82° eyepiece.  I swung the scope over to the Eastern Veil and WHOA!!!!!!  There it was, in all its glory.  A little too big to fit the whole thing in the EP at once, I kept swinging the scope back and forth over the length of the nebula, totally blown away with how clear it suddenly was.  I had been wanting to see this object from day 1, and have read about people's reactions when they first saw it.  I was no different.  I don't even know how long I spent swinging the scope back and forth, just taking it all in as if it would disappear at any second.  As my first light adrenaline calmed down, I swung the scope down and found the Western Veil as well, another stunning site with 52 Cyg bisecting it and lighting it up so brightly!  Just amazing! 
       
      I never tired of looking at the veil, but eventually wanted to try to bag a couple more objects.  I panned all of the way around to the Rosette Nebula.  I found the telltale cluster that lies in the middle of the nebula, and was soon admiring the light ring of smoke surrounding the cluster.  With a little time and effort, I was able to tease out enough detail to really see what the Rosette was all about, and once again, I was not disappointed.  Next came the Helix Nebula, another object I've tried and failed to find in the past.  This night I was successful, though after seeing the prior 2 targets the Helix was more of just a passing find for the checklist.
       
      I scoped out M42 with the OIII filter and was able to make out some details I hadn't previously seen.  Since I was already there, I switched to a smaller EP and got some magnification going so I could observe the trapezium, once again managing to see the "e" star but no "f".
       
      I still missed some of the major objects on my list.  I have yet to see the Heart or Soul Nebulas and couldn't find them on this night.  I have yet to get any substantial views of the North America Nebula.  I missed the Witch Head and Cocoon as well.  
       
      I took the filters off and surfed around the Universe bagging a few beautiful galaxies, including Stephan's Quintet and the Deerlick Cluster.  I scoped out NGC 777 in Triangulum, always a cool object to tease out of the dark skies.  I saw NGC 253, the Sculptor Galaxy, for my first time.  This is a cool target to which I need to return.   A few globulars and open clusters later, and I was getting chilly and ready to call it a night.
       
      All in all I had a great session and managed first light on a few major targets I'd been hoping to see for a long time.  As always, there was plenty that I didn't get around to looking for, and more that I missed with an attempt, serving only to heighten my desire to find them on a future night.  I'm glad all you folks across the pond are getting some nice views, and it sounds like everyone but me was out looking at the Horsey.  Maybe I'll add that my my advanced list of future challenges.  Thanks for reading!
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.