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Hello from Manchester


wigan1895
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Hi Folks, from what was a sunny Manchester morning, but as I write the clouds are rolling in from the east. Well I feel a bit of a fraud on this board as a don’t qualify as a stargazer having no knowledge of the sky being more of a walker. But since I do tend to walk in remote parts of the UK and Europe I do get to see a fair number of very dark and clear nights and you can’t help being captivated by the sight.

As for equipment, well, light weight Swarovski Optik 10 x 25 binoculars, some larger Opticron 10x 50 and an Opticron birding scope yes I do admit it, they are all aimed at walking and birding rather then looking at the night sky, but …

Being a novice I often see things in the night sky that I can’t identify, so I thought I would hang around here and read all the advice you good folk are giving, and maybe one day be able to contribute

Kieron

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Hi there and welcome to the forums, we have all sorts here so don't feel like you don't fit the mould as it were.

I hope you enjoy your stay and find the site useful and informative, feel free to ask any questions there are alot of knowledgeable people here who can help :clouds2:

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Hi There Kieron

As Grant says, don't feel a fraud at all, we welcome everyone with an interest in looking skyward.

You have some nice bino's there and these are perfect for taking a look some constellations and deep sky objects.

Here's a couple of pointers:

Venus - Seen low in the SW horizon during dusk. The brightest thing in the sky showing a fantastic crescent

Pleiades (M45) - Also known as the Seven Sisters. A bright collection of 6/7 stars visible with the naked eye. Bino's will show you many more.

Orion Nebula (M42) - Once the very recognisable constellation of Orion is up, look below the three belt stars for a small 'smudge'. This is the nebula. Bino's should show you some structure of the nebula.

Saturn - Currently a late night object, but worth the effort. Watch for it over the Eastern horizon

Let us know how you get on - we are interested in what you see and your reactions!

Also, feel free to ask any questions - we are always glad to help :clouds2:

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Welcome to the forum,

You don't have to have expensive scopes or equipment to enjoy astronomy, I started with a pair of cheap bino's and a healthy interest - just like yourself :clouds2:

A nice binocular object is M42 in Orion see the chart below, this is one of my favourites. My favourite astro objects are Nebulas so I tend to use low power scopes or bino's.

Hope you find the chart usefull and hope to chat again.

Greg

image.jpg

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The Beehive, an open star cluster right next to Saturn at the moment, is a fine sight in binoculars or your birding scope. I first saw a lot of this stuff in binoculars. There is also the Hyades, a very loose open cluster in Taurus, grouped about Aldebaran, the bright reddish star above Orion, about half way to the Pleiades.

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Hi Kieron, and welcome.

Birding and astronomy are very compatable hobbies. On a recent trip to Hawai'i for a seminar, there were hundreds of astronomers of all descriptions from amateurs to pros. There were also dozens of birders in the group! Field trips with this crowd were hectic, with the astronomical sights competing with groups of birders running off into the jungles! Made me laugh out loud several times.

Feel free to ask any questions at all. We're a friendly bunch of nuts! :clouds2:

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Welcome to the stargzers lounge Kieron.

Listen mate your only a fraud when you say that you know something

when you really don't, not when you are here to learn so enjoy your

time here and don't be afraid to ask any questions as someone

is bound to know the answer and help you out.

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