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Qualia

What Can I Expect to See....?

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Brilliant. Thank you. I'm just staring out, and this has been a great help.

Sent from my HTC One using Tapatalk

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Thankyou very much for this very helpful advice I can continue my new found hobby knowing you have helped me understand more thanks

Mark

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Brilliant post, I've read it (mostly looked at the pictures really) several times, this was what I based the whole purchase of my telescope on. It was the question on my lips (or fingers) and Google took me to SGL.

Last night I saw Andromeda for the first time. Wow that little smudge is mind boggling. That's a night I'll remember for the rest of my life! Next to find some more DSO's

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When I got my first scope I was expecting to see hubble-type images and when I saw Jupiter as a small dot I was a bit disappointed. People need to know what to expect from their scopes before buying and this post is the best way to explain that.

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Great advice and very helpful when I got my first telescope I soon became disappointed with my views of things and wanted to see things in much more detail so bought a bigger scope then moved on to a DSLR camera to see thing with much better then what my eyes can see so I kind of refers my camera as a new pair of eyes to observe with.

Sent from my Nexus 7 using Tapatalk

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When I got my first scope I was expecting to see hubble-type images and when I saw Jupiter as a small dot I was a bit disappointed. People need to know what to expect from their scopes before buying and this post is the best way to explain that.

I went in the other direction, knew fine well I wouldnt see hubble images but trained myself to appreciate every single thing I do manage to catch. makes a beginner scope like mine a cheap investment but blows my mind when I catch the unexpected.

I think all beginners should lower expectations and just enjoy what they do manage to glimpse.

to echo previous posts, thanks for putting this together.

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I went in the other direction, knew fine well I wouldnt see hubble images but trained myself to appreciate every single thing I do manage to catch. makes a beginner scope like mine a cheap investment but blows my mind when I catch the unexpected.

I think all beginners should lower expectations and just enjoy what they do manage to glimpse.

to echo previous posts, thanks for putting this together.

That smiley professor Brian Cox said on one of his programmes something about the more you understand what you're looking at, the more you appreciate it's beauty. I think that really is the case when a grown man can get excited at a grey smudge so feint that sometimes your not even sure if it's actually there.

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Thanks Qualia - excellent post.  As a beginner, it is incredibly helpful to have my expectations clarified like this.

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That smiley professor Brian Cox said on one of his programmes something about the more you understand what you're looking at, the more you appreciate it's beauty. I think that really is the case when a grown man can get excited at a grey smudge so feint that sometimes your not even sure if it's actually there.

just so true.

great post

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To the OP, a great post, well written, and confidence inspiring for any relative newcomer.

Cheers,

Rich

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Absolutely crystal clear! I have to disagree on the fragrance and sex appeal of Brad Pitt: ever since I started using Lynx, I just can't get peace.

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spot on. I'm a new stargazer and of course this is exactly what I'm seeing with my 6" reflector. I'm glad I've read this after buying though, I might otherwise have held off, and still always wondered!

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Thanks for a very useful guide for a newbie. If I can see that sort of 4" view of M31 I'll be happy!

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I read through this when it was first posted, now just gone through it again and picked up more. Although I've been messing around for a couple of years, I still see myself as a complete beginner. This helps put things in a proper perspective and keep expectations realistic.

Thanks

Jason

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Thank you for your kind message, Jason.

I sincerely hope that although the post may appear to temper expectations, it doesn't prey on the wonder of stargazing and astronomy. The original post arose from seeing a good number of threads pertaining to a deep sense of disappointment, of being let down by the telescope and views obtained, and my theory was and still is that the new members had unrealistic expectations about what the scope would show them.

I don't want to change anyone or to show folk that they were wrong, but to point out that the perceived limitation of an amateur telescope does not equate to its weakness. We appear so fragile and delicate and small surfing space on this tiny blue dot, that it is a wonder we can see anything at all. I wanted to share a little of that wonder but in no way exaggerating it with false promises and half-told truths. I wanted a post where new comers would be able to make a well-informed decision and if they did buy a scope to be really glad of their choice because it would now give them the chance to love and to work and to play with stargazing and astronomy and to look up at the stars.

Perhaps I have failed a little in the task, perhaps the OP does come across as a bit dry or cutting, but as you so wisely say, Jason, we are all still learning, we are all still beginners on this cosmic journey which by equal measure makes us all great teachers :grin: .

Thank you again for the kind thoughts.

Rob

Edited by Qualia
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Qualia,

your original post does a wonderful job, as your last post states, its a wonder that we can see any thing more than the Luna surface from this 3rd rock, and i agree that newcomers may purchase a telescope expecting to see hubble type views, your first post puts things into context, a job well done

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I find that the longer you look in the eyepiece, the better you see things. 

When the current mrs Jesterowl and myself go out we have to share the scope (that i bought for her birthday in September) so generally don't spend as much time at the eyepiece as would be ideal. 

with this in mind i persuaded her that i NEED my own scope so we can spend longer looking at stuff :)

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Wow. Life has kept me away from the forums for a bit, so I've only just caught up... This is an awesome post Qualia, spectacularly well written and giving just the right mix of realism and enthusiasm. :D

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