Jump to content

Stargazers Lounge Uses Cookies

Like most websites, SGL uses cookies in order to deliver a secure, personalised service, to provide social media functions and to analyse our traffic. Continued use of SGL indicates your acceptance of our cookie policy.

sgl_imaging_challenge_banner_lunar_close-ups_winners.thumb.jpg.b5fb18580607a749e382266fe55a02a1.jpg

Qualia

What Can I Expect to See....?

Recommended Posts

I was one of those novices who thought i would see close up, colorful images of everything like i see in the books.

Only to feel let down when i actually looked through my new telescope, but what has surprised me is i am still passionate and intrigued by space and all that is out there.

My most memorable evening was spent looking at Saturn and even though it was small (very small) i can say i have seen it and it's rings with my own eye's and as the OP states the longer you look the more you see, so don't spend just a few minutes starring at the new found object and then move on to something else, plan on a good hour or so and you will see a whole lot more than you did in the first few minutes i guarantee it.

BTW you don't have to keep your eye at the EP the whole time, you look for a few minutes at a time, take a swig of coffee, relax and marvel at the fact that what you and others see as a star with the naked eye is actually something a whole lot more when viewed through a telescope.

Great post and a must read for all new and old into astronomy.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

....I knew things would be small but my most memorable moment so-far, from my limited view of the night sky, is with Jupiter, and only for a few  fleeting seconds,  perfect image, burnt to memory,  looking forward for the next one.
My worst letdown, M31 from my garden, until  viewed from a darker site,  now even my 70° afov may  not wide enough?

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Very interesting to a total beginner!.. need to buy a Hubble.. 😔 or spend more time on a comfy chair looking at the stars! Appreciate your time to post. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Very informative and educating... Thanks for posting this piece. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A very good post indeed. My first vision of Saturn was just 2 months ago, I was so amazed at what i was seeing. I do have to agree wasnt sure what to expect and it was smaller than i had imagined in my head i suppose. All the same was very amazing and looking at the other example pics gives me good ideas of what i will see while observing other areas. Thank you very much.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am a total newbie to astronomy, though I've always been interested and have kicked around the idea of buying a telescope for years.  About a week ago I went to our local observatory for my first time.  Along with getting to look at a couple of objects through the big telescope, they had several smaller scopes set up outside.  One gentleman had his private scope there and was allowing people to look at Saturn.  My expectations were low, I figured it would just appear as a star.  When I first looked through his scope and saw a planet with rings so clearly, I was gobstruck.  I couldn't believe it and was hooked.  I am extremely excited to embark upon this adventure in the sky.  It fascinates me that our night sky is a literal window to the universe.

 

Anyway, I just came across this website and found this piece of writing.  Wonderfully written, very informative, and I count myself among those who find the OP and subsequent posts far more inspiring than limiting.  You all make up a great community, and I hope to find myself a part of it very soon! First scope is in the mail!!!

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Your first Saturn is always etched in your mind and will never leave. I remember my first time in 1972 at age 12. Jupiter too. The only thing I'd change from these views would be to have a celebration with the best food & drink to go with.

Make a whole day celebration!

Dave

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Great write up. Wasnt sure what expect starting out earlier this year. This article spelled out very good.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As a newbie, I found this article, very informing. just purchased my first scope (Celestron Nextsar 4se). Of course i am itching to get out with it and start observing, but yes you've guessed it. 90-100% cloud cover forecast for the next week. Funny though that at some points during daylight hours it is down to 20 - 25%. Just suppose i will have to wait. at least it will give me time to absorb the vast amount of information that i seem to be bombarded with.

Once again, Great article.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What a fab article, thank you so much for putting it together. Very imformative and to the point.

Being a total beginner I'm not going to get my hopes up too high, but I am still itching to get out there and start observing. Typically, cloud cover in my area will be above 90% for the next few days, which I guess will give me plenty of time to drink all of this information in!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi

Just re-read this article after buying my first telescope a SW 200 reflector HEQ5 Pro Goto mount.  Luckily my expectations had been tempered by this article and a talk by the local Astro group.  Now just about getting the hang of all the complications and terminology but I will add my 'Eureka' moment. 

Just generally hopping around the sky, getting used to the controls, I targeted Cygnus and Albireo.  What a sight, I could clearly differentiate the two stars and the colours were amazing.  I was cold (it is December) but stayed out for another hour and convinced SWMBO to have a look at why I spent the money.  Impressed!

Sunnie

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One big mistake people make is looking through a telescope and it is just that: looking. On the other hand observing is completely different, it takes time, patience  and it is an intellectual experience.

Curiosity is beautiful to watch: I will always remember a young girl of 10 possibly 12 years old at a public star party where many scopes were present and she would come back so many times observing through my scope for long period of time, I thought she was going to be swallowed by the scope, her endless and pertinent questions moved me. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Excellent work. just joined, observed as a child, lost my way really should have stuck with it. However, great post, and very informative. Just purchased a Bresser 70 to ignite the passion again, ideally I'd love to combine my other passions which are walking/camping/photography with some wild camp astro shoots. :-) Would be amazing. Or even taking my camper van out for a spin. Anyone know of any good spots here in the UK for observing? I'm from Manchester, live at the foot of the peaks... 

Cheers

Dave. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/04/2018 at 13:43, 212digital said:

Excellent work. just joined, observed as a child, lost my way really should have stuck with it. However, great post, and very informative. Just purchased a Bresser 70 to ignite the passion again, ideally I'd love to combine my other passions which are walking/camping/photography with some wild camp astro shoots. :-) Would be amazing. Or even taking my camper van out for a spin. Anyone know of any good spots here in the UK for observing? I'm from Manchester, live at the foot of the peaks... 

Cheers

Dave. 

I remember camping as a youngster in the Lake District, and the skies were incredible.  Not too far for you :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Rob

Great post

Have to agree with you when observing Saturn and Jupiter

Recently was doing a presentation at local primary school, and after all the students been through several scopes club members had set up

Had one parent walk back up to me, and he had a iPad, with image on Saturn on it

His comment to me, he can see more detail on his iPad of the rings of Saturn, then he could through the eyepiece on my 10" dob

I reminded him, we were observing something which is 1.3 billion kms away, and the image you looking at on your iPad, was taken through a telescope, and magnified many times over

Had another lady walk up to me

She said she was 83 years of age, and first time she has seen both Saturn and Jupiter through a telescope, and was overall by what she observed

She went onto to say, her great grand daughter, is in grade one, at school, was giving presentation, and could not thank us enough, for giving her great grand daughter, the opportunity to observe Saturn and Jupiter, which took her almost her entire life time

Does not matter how big or small, an object you are viewing, it is the enjoyment of sharing

That night also focused on Jewel Box, Omega Centauri, been in the southern hemisphere

Looking forward to your next instalment

John

 

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.