Jump to content

Stargazers Lounge Uses Cookies

Like most websites, SGL uses cookies in order to deliver a secure, personalised service, to provide social media functions and to analyse our traffic. Continued use of SGL indicates your acceptance of our cookie policy.

stargazine_ep28_banner.thumb.jpg.b94278254f44dd38f3f7ee896fe45525.jpg

MarkMittlesteadt

Knowing the night sky versus GoTo...and light pollution...

Recommended Posts

I am relatively new to astronomy despite my age. I use a push to dob, no motors, no wires to trip over, connects wirelessly to my ipad but if I want to just use it as a manual dob I can.

It's enabled me to see lots of things that I'd still be looking for. I now know what they look like, so if I could find them manually I'd recognise them.

Its great , and I find it a wonderful aid.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm certain that a Dob is quicker and more accurate on easy targets. Grab and go is just so much more rewarding and relaxing than GOTO.

Unfortunately in Middle England we get few nights of continuous observing and there's so much new to see. There's just not enough time to check charts and star hop and id new targets by hand .

That's the beauty and ease of GOTO,

Nick.

You have hit it in one.

ATM I star hop(badly) and get a real sense of achievement when I eventually find that faint fuzzy but more and more I have been considering going for a GOTO dob. I want to spend my time observing not hunting down my target.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've done all types of finding and tracking including: push to, slo mo, ra motor, dual motor, auto, encoders, and goto, across most types of mount including equatorial, alt/az, dob, wedge, hybrid (az/eq), as well as most types of ota: reflector, refractor, compound, fast, slow, achro, appo, etc.

The one big thing you need with all of them is a knowledge of the sky. A large push to dob is as useless as an NEQ6 Pro if you don't know what you want to look at, image, or show to someone else. It's also nice to know one or two things about the different types of object and and equipment, and being able to speak a little about all of it, whilst also having the right equipment to demonstrate stuff to other interested folks.

Imho - It's all astronomy whichever way you look at it - and anyone can do it whichever way they like and with whatever equipment  they're comfy with. I enjoy it all with no particular preferences. :)

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've done all types of finding and tracking including: push to, slo mo, ra motor, dual motor, auto, encoders, and goto, across most types of mount including equatorial, alt/az, dob, wedge, hybrid (az/eq), as well as most types of ota: reflector, refractor, compound, fast, slow, achro, appo, etc.

The one big thing you need with all of them is a knowledge of the sky. A large push to dob is as useless as an NEQ6 Pro if you don't know what you want to look at, image, or show to someone else. It's also nice to know one or two things about the different types of object and and equipment, and being able to speak a little about all of it, whilst also having the right equipment to demonstrate stuff to other interested folks.

Imho - It's all astronomy whichever way you look at it - and anyone can do it whichever way they like and with whatever equipment  they're comfy with. I enjoy it all with no particular preferences. :)

That's a good post Brantuk. I spent a long time trying to improve my knowledge of the night sky before I bought a scope. But I think anything that gets you outside and viewing helps as well, whether you're using goto, push to or manual. The act of doing, and being interested can't help but improve your knowledge. So overtime you become more experienced regardless, and able to decide the best way for you to enjoy the hobby.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Trouble his most people get the scope first and learn from there I would imagine 85% do this

So each to there own

Pat

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Trouble his most people get the scope first and learn from there I would imagine 85% do this

So each to there own

Pat

Nothing wrong with that either.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"But I think anything that gets you outside and viewing helps as well, whether you're using goto, push to or manual"

Absolutely Scoot - we all have to start somewhere - even if it's only with binoculars. After all - the interesting bit of the hobby is the night sky and what's up there. :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Anybody tried a variant of Dirk Gently's Zen navigation? Point your scope in the same direction as an astronomer who looks like he knows what he's doing ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Anybody tried a variant of Dirk Gently's Zen navigation? Point your scope in the same direction as an astronomer who looks like he knows what he's doing ;)

Well I've got some clear skies forecast here in London so I'm currently sat in my living room thinking about taking the telescope out. I think that's Zen astronomy. Actually, I think it might be slightly more tantric. Ahem.

I think the fact that GOTO 'scopes encourage more people to get out there and view through them would prevent me from getting snobby about them. That and I quite fancy buying one maybe next year...

DD

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Anybody tried a variant of Dirk Gently's Zen navigation? Point your scope in the same direction as an astronomer who looks like he knows what he's doing ;)

Last one I met looking down a scope didn't actually have a clue what he was looking at.

When he asked what something prominemt was I told him, he didn't believe me, 3 times.

So he asked someone with a phone app and got the same answer as I had given.

To an extent we all use goto's. :eek:

Goto scope, book, software, they all tell us what is there, what it is and how to find it. :rolleyes: :rolleyes:

If you tried to make your own list of non-comet objects I bet you wouldn't end up with the same as Messier did. :grin: :grin: :grin:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Last one I met looking down a scope didn't actually have a clue what he was looking at.

When he asked what something prominemt was I told him, he didn't believe me, 3 times.

So he asked someone with a phone app and got the same answer as I had given.

To an extent we all use goto's. :eek:

Goto scope, book, software, they all tell us what is there, what it is and how to find it. :rolleyes: :rolleyes:

If you tried to make your own list of non-comet objects I bet you wouldn't end up with the same as Messier did. :grin: :grin: :grin:

Most certainly not, I would have included NGC 2903 ;)

I do at times just trundle through the skies with bins and see what comes into view. I then try to identify it. Great fun, and a great way to learn the skies. This has stood me in very good stead under unfamiliar skies in South Africa and Australia.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Michael, I have the same problem with unfamiliar Australian skies... And I live here!! ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
(my time is free).

Lol. Your either a woman or an un-married man.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.