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ZerOne01

Hello from Malaysia

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Hi, my name is Afiq. I'm not particularly new in this community since I've been lurking for 2 years. But in terms of contributing and discussing, I am really new.

Total beginner and a person who love to gaze onto skies since I was a small kid, and own a decent 10 x 50 bino.

I don't have any basics yet in determining constellations (in simple words, I'm just started!). I wonder if there is any differences between southern hemisphere skies and equator skies that I need to take into account when reading posts from here? We are situated just a degree north from the equator so the sky here isn't always good, depends on the tropical climate we have.

Anyway, glad meeting you all. Hopefully I'll gained more inputs here. Thanks :)

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Welcome to SGL.

1 Deg N? are you in JB? That would mean Singapore and major light pollution to the south.

The southern skies have some very nice DSO which would be visible from your location, the Milky Way in the southern hemisphere is spectacular, but the southern constellations are less bright in many cases, whereas the northern skies have the brighter constellations.

Your location is going to be an interesting one if you have to set up an EQ mount as you can see neither polar area. But it does mean that the ecliptic will be nice and high most of the year.

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yes tropical climates really hurt . even if when sky is clear , lots of moisture reduce the visibility . i am india , which has a tropical and subtropical wet weather . my location is 20 degree 8 minute north latitude , i face the same problem . in my location , decent months for night sky observing is from november to may ( february , march being the best ) .

recognizing the constellations is the basic step of stargazing . start by naked eye viewing , make out the bright constellations , then using the binocular to discern the fainter ones . once u know how the night sky works in a yearly cycle ( how night sky changes in a complete yearly cycle ) , and make out various constellations , then u can easily find various deep sky objects like galaxy , nebula , star clusters , double stars using binoculars and telescopes . the joy in stargazing lies in finding new targets gradually . like u , i do not own a telescope yet .

there is difference between southern hemisphere skies and equator skies in what u can see .

suppose your latitude is x degree ( positive for north , negative for south ) , and declination of a celestial object ( star etc ) is y degree . the maximum altitude of that star in your location is 90- ( difference between x and y ) . by this u can know , which stars u can see in your location and which u can not .

however , download a astronomy software called " stellarium " and learn how it works . it will really help u in stargazing .

stellarium.org

any way welcome to SGL . I am a new member too . hope we get to learn a lot from here and can enjoy stargazing :laugh:

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well i find , sourthern sky is better than northern sky , in terms of DSO , and will look more starry i guess .

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Welcome to SGL.

1 Deg N? are you in JB? That would mean Singapore and major light pollution to the south.

The southern skies have some very nice DSO which would be visible from your location, the Milky Way in the southern hemisphere is spectacular, but the southern constellations are less bright in many cases, whereas the northern skies have the brighter constellations.

Your location is going to be an interesting one if you have to set up an EQ mount as you can see neither polar area. But it does mean that the ecliptic will be nice and high most of the year.

Yeah but I resides in Pahang now so it should be 3 Deg N, and less light pollution here fortunately haha. So Is there any differences between 3 Deg N and 60 N Deg in terms of DSOs and sky viewing?

yes tropical climates really hurt . even if when sky is clear , lots of moisture reduce the visibility . i am india , which has a tropical and subtropical wet weather . my location is 20 degree 8 minute north latitude , i face the same problem . in my location , decent months for night sky observing is from november to may ( february , march being the best ) .

recognizing the constellations is the basic step of stargazing . start by naked eye viewing , make out the bright constellations , then using the binocular to discern the fainter ones . once u know how the night sky works in a yearly cycle ( how night sky changes in a complete yearly cycle ) , and make out various constellations , then u can easily find various deep sky objects like galaxy , nebula , star clusters , double stars using binoculars and telescopes . the joy in stargazing lies in finding new targets gradually . like u , i do not own a telescope yet .

there is difference between southern hemisphere skies and equator skies in what u can see .

suppose your latitude is x degree ( positive for north , negative for south ) , and declination of a celestial object ( star etc ) is y degree . the maximum altitude of that star in your location is 90- ( difference between x and y ) . by this u can know , which stars u can see in your location and which u can not .

however , download a astronomy software called " stellarium " and learn how it works . it will really help u in stargazing .

stellarium.org

any way welcome to SGL . I am a new member too . hope we get to learn a lot from here and can enjoy stargazing :laugh:

well i find , sourthern sky is better than northern sky , in terms of DSO , and will look more starry i guess .

Ah thanks for the tips! Yeah I'm still confuse with navigational stuff. I think I should practice by using Stellarium then.

Thanks again :)

A warm welcome to SGL

Thanks :)

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Yeah but I resides in Pahang now so it should be 3 Deg N, and less light pollution here fortunately haha. So Is there any differences between 3 Deg N and 60 N Deg in terms of DSOs and sky viewing?

Ah thanks for the tips! Yeah I'm still confuse with navigational stuff. I think I should practice by using Stellarium then.

Thanks again :)

Thanks :)

well , u can see southern sky stars and DSO , BUT the person living in 60 N , can not . and u can see all the northern sky objects in the best conditions !

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well , u can see southern sky stars and DSO , BUT the person living in 60 N , can not . and u can see all the northern sky objects in the best conditions !

Ah I see. Thanks :)

And thanks for the warm welcome guys!

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