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Hi all, last night the sky looked very clear, so i thought i'd take the camera out and try to capture the summer Milky way, so i drove a few miles outside of Norwich to a reasonably darkish site, but noticed there was a lot of moisture in the air, the lightdome from Norwich and Wymondham was sizeable but straight up wasn't to bad, so i set the tripod up and grabbed my new Canon 6D..........and no quick release pad :icon_cry: it was on my telephoto at home, D'oh

But the milkyway looked so amazing and so close to a city i had to persevere, set the focus, set 10 second timer and laid it face up on the roof of the car, far from perfect but the resulting pics made me smile, this is one of the shots.......

post-17906-0-38018400-1378400619_thumb.j

Its a single exposure at 17mm 20 seconds @ f/4 and an ISO of 6400.

The processing brought out some noise but its lightyears ahead of the cropped 60D in terms of quality, if only i'd remembered the quick release pad :BangHead:

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Another cracking advert for Canons latest FF sensors :) ....

The QR plate problem is a nightmare... At the moment I have 4 different types across my tripods and monopods.... I make sure I have spares of each and there's always one fitted to each head in addition to the ones on the cameras and tripod collars...

Peter..

Sent from my GT-P7300 using Tapatalk 4

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Cheers Peter, i've got three but all were at home, The Milky way looks so much better in the summer, shame you have to stay up that much later to view it, but definitely worth it :)

Just out of curiosity, is the "Summer Triangle" in the above shot, there is some distortion because of the wideness of the lens but i'm thinking its just in, was a bit hit and miss in the aiming :grin:

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