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astrodam

Fireworks galaxy and NGC6939

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Hi all,

I'm still quite new to imaging and last night I attempted the fireworks galaxy and its neighbouring open cluster. The moon was pretty low when I started so I hope this didn't affect my exposures. I ended up with 11x45s lights and 5 darks (using the kit listed below) which I put through DSS and then tinkered with in GIMP2.

post-31009-0-50674000-1377678461_thumb.j

I just about teased out some galaxy detail but I was disappointed about the reddish glow in the middle of the image which I couldn't seem to remove without reducing the galaxy detail :( Does anyone have any hints about processing or could tell me what the glow is in the middle of the image is down to?

Thanks for looking :) Clear Skies!

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Had a quick lunchtime play in Photoshop......reducing the red area went OK I think but my attempt to enhance the Fireworks galaxy turned out to be a bit of a

damp squid. :rolleyes:

post-849-0-09398100-1377693165_thumb.jpg

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Thanks CW, I like that the red area has gone, what caused that? Is it the mirror of my scope? :) is this removal possible in GIMP2? And do you think its a case of needing a lot more data?

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I like that the red area has gone, what caused that?

Almost certainly vignetting - all optical systems have it. You need to take flats to remove it.

NigelM

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Almost certainly vignetting - all optical systems have it. You need to take flats to remove it.

NigelM

I have seen this phrase floating around, I shall look into how to take flats :) is there an easy way to do this?

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Point the scope at a clear sky (could also use a laptop screen with an all white display.

Set the camera exposure on auto and take a whole sequence of images. These can be combined as a master flat.

Not very scientific but it worked for me when I was starting out with a 350D.

Andrew

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Point the scope at a clear sky (could also use a laptop screen with an all white display.

Set the camera exposure on auto and take a whole sequence of images. These can be combined as a master flat.

Not very scientific but it worked for me when I was starting out with a 350D.

Andrew

Thanks Andrew, Laptop screen sounds good :) My bathroom window overlooks the garden and when the light is on it is really bright, I was going to try pointing my scope at the window with the light on to take flats. I will try your idea out though, next time. Nice one :)

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