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HnrKS

PC Screen for night vision adaptive

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Hello everyone.. I always picking my laptop when I'm going to observe Deep Sky Objects.. But there is one problem.. My laptop screen is too shiny.. When I look into the screen I always having adapt my eyes again. I always picking minimum screen brightness level, also stellarium night vision mode. Maybe there is some programs, that screen make more dark?

I sorry for my english.

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Some people use a sheet of red perspex (acrylic sheet) to help. Just place it in front of the normal (but dim setting) screen.

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BackyardEOS has a download called BackyardRED which is a standalone feature which makes your screen suitable for night vision.

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Some people use a sheet of red perspex (acrylic sheet) to help. Just place it in front of the normal (but dim setting) screen.

That's nice idea, but little bit unconfortable.

BackyardEOS has a download called BackyardRED which is a standalone feature which makes your screen suitable for night vision.

That's great, but working not full.. When opening another program (Windows 8 maybe only), BackyardRED minimizing and vision turning off.

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Well.. Thanks very much :) Found dark red glass, that would work. Thanks again.

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Well.. Thanks very much :) Found dark red glass, that would work. Thanks again.

Im sorry but why is Perspex / Acrylic uncomfortable and glass not? Unless you have secure method of fixing glass sounds heavy and breakable to me, yet a thin sheet of Perspex or even acetate will be easy to hold in place, lightweight and safer. Think about the does as well.

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I agree with the above, go with acetate. Glass is fragile, acetate can be cut to a custom size and held on with tape - plus you will have enough left to do your smartphone.

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Being clumsy, as I am, I can shut a laptop screen with acetate in place and not worry :grin:

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Well, thanks again.. I'll try that also..

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Some people (like myself) have trouble with using red lights/filters after long periods of use. The problem is temporary color blindness that can last for up to an hour - when this happens, some colors like red or amber may look greenish and blues may look pale green, as examples. This effect slowly disappears after a half hour or more and does not damage your eyes at all.

The problem with stargazing is that when you are trying to detect those faint, washed out colors in some objects, they may not appear during this condition or if they do, they may be the wrong colors. Years ago I was at a dark sky site and used a very dim red light to read maps and charts over a few hours. After packing up to leave, my car's headlights were not the usual "white" (halogen bulbs)but noticeably yellow. Red stop lights looked an amber--green, greens looked yellow, etc. As an hour passed, the proper colors returned slowly. From that night on, I only use enough dim torch light (yellowish-white color) to read charts, etc. Doing this, I have had no more episodes of temporary color blindness and when observing faint color hues in some objects, they appear as they should.

Being your young age, you may or may not notice this effect but be aware to the possibility. As people with blue eyes are said to be more prone to normal color blindness, this may also increase the color change problem? My eyes are brown so anything goes. So if you do use a dim red light while observing, don't be surprised when coming inside and finding normal colors changed for a while. If this does happen, try using "gray" or "smoke" colored sunglasses while viewing the screen, then removed while observing. Your night vision will stay intact without causing the color problems, if they occur with red light/filters.

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