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One of the brightest nova in recent history, 6mag is now visible in Delphinus. Here's you chance to record the varying brightness and collect useful spectra of an amazing object!! http://www.cbat.eps.

Many thanks for the post, I'll take a look as soon as I have the opportunity. It takes me back to the 70s and another nova Del, I think it was designated HR? Anyway, back in those days I used to do

Drifting cloud last night Thursday Aug 22 after dusk but got a quick shot via piggybacked 1100d and est mag at m5.5 against circled star and Sloan DSS. Perhaps more importantly [for me!] my 5th spect

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Just been looking at the area in pockets sky atlas and if it's around mag 4.5 - and it a appears from recent sighting to be about that tonight, it will be almost a match for 29 Vulpecula and should see both in a 5 deg binocular or finder field and nothing as bright as these anywhere nearby. I would assume if you can see 29 Vul naked eye you'll spot the nova. It's ok here - the moon's looming.

andrew

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Just spotted it in 10x50s about 9.50 ! It's in the same field field of view as 29 Vul about 4 deg across both the brightest stars in the field. A bit a haze just appearing it is no quite as bright as 29 Vul but around 5th mag. Nice to see it - not good enough conditions to see with naked eye though.

Getting a bit of haze - it's brighter than Eta Sagitta which is a touch over 5 mag.

andrew

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I Picked up the Nova at 10.00pm tonight before a big cloud bank encroached. It's easy to find with a distinctive asterism below it, which reminds me of part of Scorpius - but I have a good imagination! Anyway, I used two nearby stars for comparison which turned out to be 29 Vulpecula, mag 4.80 and Eta Sagitta, mag 5.05. I made it .2 or .3 brighter than Eta. It was close in magnitude to 29, and after a few mts I decided it was the same mag, +/- .1 of a magnitude. This gives a magnitude of 4.8. Forgot to mention, I was using hand-held 10x50 binoculars. I read somewhere it had been estimated at 4.4, so if this is correct it would seem to be fading. Regards, Paul

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I found it about 2330 yesterday - it is naked eye visible from a fairly shaded spot amongst the street lights of Reading. Through bins it definitely looked to be brighter than 29 Vulpecula to me. I would have estimated about magnitude 4.5-4.6.

My first nova! Time for beer.

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I had to wait until 2am (17/08/2013) for the clouds to clear tonight. The Nova was easy in 10 x 50 binos and just visible naked eye. I would estimate mag 4.6. The naked eye observation was confirmed, when by chance an aeroplane passed right next to it. They do have their uses.

Kevin

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Does anyone know the official mag. of the nova last night. It would appear from reading here to be anywhere between 4.5 to near 5. I'm not much good at estimating these things as don't observe variables to gain skills. I wonder if the colours make any difference - and your eye could be more sensitive to a certain tint?

I looked mainly in binoculars and had the nova and 29 vul in the same field - to me it was very hard to detect much in it and at times 29 at 4.8 looked possible a shade brighter. Others thought the opposite - being visible to the eye at about 11.30 with the moon and not perfect conditions it would have to be a bit more than 5 though.

Great is was clear for a lot of us to see.

andrew

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Viewed the Nova last night with my Astro Tech 4" frac and various EPs. I estimated that the Nova was slightly brighter than mag 5. Hopefully, the clouds will keep away over the coming nights so we can see any changes in magnitude.

Mark

PS - I found this information interesting - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_novae

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...PS - I found this information interesting - http://en.wikipedia....i/List_of_novae...

That is interesting Mark. Thanks for posting the link :smiley:

I was reading somewhere else that this star was originally dimmer than magnitude 13 and possibly as dim as mag 17. That's a huge amount of brightening in such a short time :shocked:

While not as catastrophic as a supernova I guess it's probably "curtains" for lifeforms on any planets orbiting within a reasonable distance of the star.

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That is interesting Mark. Thanks for posting the link :smiley:

I was reading somewhere else that this star was originally dimmer than magnitude 13 and possibly as dim as mag 17. That's a huge amount of brightening in such a short time :shocked:

While not as catastrophic as a supernova I guess it's probably "curtains" for lifeforms on any planets orbiting within a reasonable distance of the star.

I managed to find it quite easily as its nearer Sagitta than delphinius.

I'm not sure how far away it is? (wiki has them @ between 100 and 350+ light years away) but the "curtains" bit has probably passed quite a few years ago? Its quite staggering how long light takes to travel the distance!

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I managed to find it quite easily as its nearer Sagitta than delphinius.

I'm not sure how far away it is? (wiki has them @ between 100 and 350+ light years away) but the "curtains" bit has probably passed quite a few years ago? Its quite staggering how long light takes to travel the distance!

Yes, I guess I should have used the past tense !

Of course it could have been the Vogons starting another interstellar bypass build :grin:

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