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Evostar 80ed or evostar 120ed


Hitesh
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Hi guys!!! I'm finally gonna pull the trigger and get myself a new imaging rig. Thing is I don't know which to get 80ed or the 120ed??

Also if the 80ed then would you consider the equinox 80?

Really feel like a kid in a sweet shop

Please help

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I had an SW120ED and I wish that I'd got an 80ED instead. I was only a beginner and the 120ED was just too much with regards to focal length. I would have been much better off with a shorter refractor. Then that brings me onto the 80ED. I wouldn't get one of them either! Based on the fact that you are asking about the 120ED, you clearly have a decent budget. With that, I'd get a good quality double, such as a Televue or Pentax that doesn't require a flattener to give you a flat field. The build quality of these scopes are absolutely a good step up from the Skywatcher offerings too.

I don't normally say this and just recommend the 80ED, but as you have the budget for better, I'd get considerably better.

This is based on my own experience of the Skywatcher build quality and experience, and then getting a quality doublet. Wow, what a difference. I'd always recommend the 80ED unless someone said that they had a bigger budget though. I don't want to sound snobby at all, I'm not, but I'm basing this on my own experience.

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+1 for ED80 for DSO imaging.

I have the Equinox 120 (and an Evo100) and the 120 is a very nice scope, but I see my 80mm as the workhorse, and the 120 for when you want a bit more focal length, which in my case is less often as there are some lovely targets for the 80. I see the 120 as an addition to the 80, not as a rival. That makes the 80 the better value :smiley:

The 120 is no better really for imaging, it just gives you more focal length and takes a bit more effort than an 80mm (such as the 120 is bit more prone to wind, bit harder to guide accurately because of its longer focal length, the longer tube can catch the mount legs if you're not careful, etc.).

re: 80 Evo vs 80 Equinox, tough one, either would be good :) No clear cut winner there for me.

The Equinox is faster at F6.25 (same speed as my 80mm Onyx), which is good, but then again the Evo has the matched 0.85 reducer which does not work with the Equinox 80 (I think some people use the Tele Vue TRF-2008 reducer for the Eq80). The Equinox has a better focuser, but is it good enough for heavy imaging gear and will you end up replacing it anyway? I replaced the focuser on my 120 though it was a close call and I wonder if I could have got away with it (my main issue was that the focus lock shifted the focus, but now I wonder if I really did need to lock it). I would factor in that you might have to replace it with something like a Baader Steeltrack...

The Equinox has a retractable dew shield, though you get used to the fixed one, so it's not a huge deal.

The Evo is lighter, which is quite a nice thing to have, but then the finish on the Equinox is nicer.

As swag72 said, you could put more cash into a more expensive scope. Or maybe into a CCD or mount depending on what you already have or are getting?

Edited by Luke
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I had an SW120ED and I wish that I'd got an 80ED instead. I was only a beginner and the 120ED was just too much with regards to focal length. I would have been much better off with a shorter refractor. Then that brings me onto the 80ED. I wouldn't get one of them either! Based on the fact that you are asking about the 120ED, you clearly have a decent budget. With that, I'd get a good quality double, such as a Televue or Pentax that doesn't require a flattener to give you a flat field. The build quality of these scopes are absolutely a good step up from the Skywatcher offerings too.

I don't normally say this and just recommend the 80ED, but as you have the budget for better, I'd get considerably better.

This is based on my own experience of the Skywatcher build quality and experience, and then getting a quality doublet. Wow, what a difference. I'd always recommend the 80ED unless someone said that they had a bigger budget though. I don't want to sound snobby at all, I'm not, but I'm basing this on my own experience.

Very interest, never looked into televise or Pentax, which scopes did you have in mind???

One of the reasons I was leaning towards the 120 was I intend to use it for visual now and again so I don't want to get that dreaded disease we all suffer aperture fever, also I want to future proof myself for as long as possible. (I will mount scope on Neq6, and image with my 650d dslr)

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I would personally forget the idea of one scope for imaging and visual. I'd get a quality doublet, such as a TV85 or a Pentax 75SDHF and then put the saving towards a visual scope. Any type of reflector will be fine on your NEQ6. You may even be able to dual mount them so that life is even easier.

The joy of the TV and Pentax is that there is no flattener required at all and you'll get a nice flat field with a DSLR from the off. Also, you know that you'll not have to replace the focuser as they are good and work as they should. I can not say the same for the SW offerings. If you get a SW be prepared to factor in a couple more ££ for a potential focuser upgrade. Many have had to do it.

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I would personally forget the idea of one scope for imaging and visual. I'd get a quality doublet, such as a TV85 or a Pentax 75SDHF and then put the saving towards a visual scope. Any type of reflector will be fine on your NEQ6. You may even be able to dual mount them so that life is even easier.

The joy of the TV and Pentax is that there is no flattener required at all and you'll get a nice flat field with a DSLR from the off. Also, you know that you'll not have to replace the focuser as they are good and work as they should. I can not say the same for the SW offerings. If you get a SW be prepared to factor in a couple more ££ for a potential focuser upgrade. Many have had to do it.

Fantastic stuff, cheers mate will defo look into the scopes u mentioned, who stocks those scopes online?

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You're better off going second hand to be honest. The Pentax is no longer produced and the TV85 is a good deal second hand.

Keep your eye out on ABS (Astrobuysell) and the classifieds section on SGL. Stuff comes and goes!

Edited by swag72
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Even though I use a DSLR myself, I wonder if you would get more mileage out of CCD rather than go for a premium scope plus DSLR. I haven't used a cooled CCD myself, so I hope Olly doesn't mind me quoting him:

An ED80 with flattener/reducer and good CCD will greatly out perform a Takahashi FSQ and DSLR.

For context, the thread is here:

http://stargazerslou...fractor-or-ccd/

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I would personally forget the idea of one scope for imaging and visual. I'd get a quality doublet, such as a TV85 or a Pentax 75SDHF and then put the saving towards a visual scope. Any type of reflector will be fine on your NEQ6. You may even be able to dual mount them so that life is even easier.

I, on the other hand, think the ED120 is versatile enough to be a "one scope". It has a decent aperture for visual, yet with a SW 0.8x reducer for example, makes an excellent imaging scope. However, going for two scopes would also have its advantages. An 8" dob is under £300, so doesn't cut too much into your budget and gives you a much brighter view than an ED120.

The joy of the TV and Pentax is that there is no flattener required at all and you'll get a nice flat field with a DSLR from the off. Also, you know that you'll not have to replace the focuser as they are good and work as they should. I can not say the same for the SW offerings. If you get a SW be prepared to factor in a couple more ££ for a potential focuser upgrade. Many have had to do it.

The TV85 is not flat. It will require a TV 0.8 flattener with a DSLR. You would need a quadruplet or quintuplet to get flat fields without a reducer.

William Optics GT81-DDG APO 81mm F/5.9 Triplet Refractor

I think the DDG focuser on that has had a lot of disappointed users, so I'd wait for someone who's tried it. Optically I believe some of them were very good though.

Advice about getting a CCD over a DSLR is good, unless you already have a DSLR lying around, which would ease the learning curve.

Andrew

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That's it I've already got a 650d, so don't particularly want to invest in a Ccd just yet. All in all I'm looking to spend about £3000 on a total rig, so far I've decided on mount being neq6 pro, st80 as guide scope, synguider for auto guiding, imaging scope proving to be a difficult choice

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The TV85 is not flat. It will require a TV 0.8 flattener with a DSLR. You would need a quadruplet or quintuplet to get flat fields without a reducer.

Sorry of I was wrong, one of the TV's is a flat field scope isn't it?

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I use the 120ED at the moment, reduced. It's good value for money, but the reducer adds to the price, and I have replaced the flimsy focuser. I use the ED80 as a guidescope at the moment, but that will change soon. Time to put it to proper work I think.

A smaller scope is useful in its own right with an OAG or finder guider, or as a guide scope for your next bigger one, or as a grab and go / travel scope so money is rarely wasted on something like the ED80.

/Jesper

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I had an Equinox 80 and an Equinox 120, both with flattener/reducers. I kept the 80 and sold the 120.

I'm saving for a Takahashi FSQ106. An FLT98, especially with the feathertouch focuser, would also be nice for half the price.

Get the 80 (spend the extra for the Equinox) and save the rest towards a CCD.

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I was going to sell my Equninox 120, as I'm cutting down on DSO imaging, which is what I mainly got it for. I had already sold the reducer and upgraded focuser from it before changing my mind and keeping it after all! The reason being it turned out to be a very nice scope for white light viewing and imaging of the sun. So +1 for versatility.

I've put the original focuser back on. It started slipping under the weight of a chunky Baader Herschel wedge, 2.5x powermate and webcam, but I've tightened a few screws, and it's fine now.

Edited by Luke
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That's it I've already got a 650d, so don't particularly want to invest in a Ccd just yet. All in all I'm looking to spend about £3000 on a total rig, so far I've decided on mount being neq6 pro, st80 as guide scope, synguider for auto guiding, imaging scope proving to be a difficult choice

Good choice of mount. You could possibly leave out the ST80 and get the ED120 AND the ED80. You can guide with one and image with the other, and use the ED120 for visual. Or you could consider an off-axis guider, or a finder-guider in which case you don't need a guidescope... Lots of options!

Another scope that would make a terrific dual-purpose is the Skywatcher MN190.

Sorry of I was wrong, one of the TV's is a flat field scope isn't it?

No need to apologise! I think the NP range are flat field, at least the "...is" ones

What are people's thoughts on the WO megrez 90? Looks a fine scope

It is a very good telescope, and with the right reducer it will be at least as good as the ED80. I think the focuser is better too. Build is very strong, hence it is quite heavy for its size.

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Good choice of mount. You could possibly leave out the ST80 and get the ED120 AND the ED80. You can guide with one and image with the other, and use the ED120 for visual. Or you could consider an off-axis guider, or a finder-guider in which case you don't need a guidescope... Lots of options!

Another scope that would make a terrific dual-purpose is the Skywatcher MN190.

No need to apologise! I think the NP range are flat field, at least the "...is" ones

It is a very good telescope, and with the right reducer it will be at least as good as the ED80. I think the focuser is better too. Build is very strong, hence it is quite heavy for its size.

How does a finder guider work?

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How does a finder guider work?

Skywatcher telescopes usually come with a 9x50 finderscope. You simply unscrew the black eyepiece section at the end and attach your guide camera with an adaptor http://www.modernastronomy.com/accessories.html#accAdapters

This system is small and neat as you do not need any additional mounting hardware, but tends to get mixed reviews. Some find it works extremely well, others less so.

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Would I have to collimate the 190mn? Also any idea of cooling time for said instrument?

You've basically hit on the two "disadvantages" of the MN190! It will need collimating regularly. This is something that needs to be learnt but with the right tools should become a routine exercise. Cooldown will be at least an hour. I'm not sure exactly though. However, this issue does exist for the ED120 as well, although it is less than an hour.

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