Jump to content

Banner.jpg.692da9ed9af2eace53e1dc94cfc0e912.jpg

Best dslr for beginner....


NewDawn
 Share

Recommended Posts

Hi, I've just joined and already need advice!

I'm an amateur photographer and mainly shoot landscapes, wildlife, family etc with a canon point and shoot digital camera and have no experience with dslr's and wanting to start taking pictures of night sky objects such as the moon and progress to deep sky and planets. I've not been doing astronomy all that long so I'm not sure what I would like to take pictures of most, just a bit of everything to begin with.

I understand the equipment gets quite specialist with lots of different lenses and things but as I am only just starting out I really want a camera that is basic enough for me to learn as I go along and get to grips with but also powerful enough to take wonderful pictures of the sky at night (and stars, planets etc). I would also need it to be a great all-rounder which is great at nature shots.

And all for a budget of £350! I'm not asking for much am I?! I know it's quite a cheap budget but I'm hoping to get a much better one when I really know what I'm doing.

The two I have in mind so far are the Nikon D3200 and the Canon EOS 1100D which both look great cameras. I would really appreciate views on these or any other recommendations would be welcome. I'm also going through some old posts for research. Thanks in advance.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I myself got the Canon 1100D second-hand for £180- never had a DSLR before and found it really easy (live view is a real help).

A good book is "making every photon count" by Steve Richards - it is easy to read, and will save you money in the long run. I myself wished I had this book straight away.

http://www.firstlightoptics.com/books/making-every-photon-count-steve-richards.html

The DSLR is good for wide field images and DSO but not so easy for planets, better off with a planetary camera/webcam.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yes if you plan on using it for astrophotography go for the Canon 1100D, the software support and knowledge base of users is much larger. If you plan on astromodding to increase the sensitivity to infrared be aware that it will be somewhat troublesome as you need an extra filter to use it during daytime or everyone will be pink in the face.

With that being said, I really like what Nikon has done with the new D3200 and D5100 ;)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

There's nothing wrong with the Nikon cameras, but in the main Canon models are much better supported in terms of image capture software, so they're probably the better bet. Depending on budget and what's available the 450D or 1100D are good bets. The kit 18-55mm lens isn't great for astrophotography, but if you work to its limitations it's not dreadful either for widefield images, star trails and so on. There's also the "nifty fifty" lens which is quite handy for wide field.

If you want to connect the camera to a telescope you'll probably need a T-ring and adaptor and a programmable remote is quite handy for when you don't want to use a laptop to control the camera. An external power supply is useful too if you're going to be running exposures for long periods of time. If you don't have any other mount, a tripod is also helpful. Even though it's stationary you can still get 20 to 30 second exposures without star trailing, or even run longer ones if you want star trail images. There are some really nasty tripods around. I didn't go mad on mine, but it's ok for just a camera and small lens. If you do spend a bit more it may be sufficient for supporting binoculars too.

James

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Have to give another vote for the 1100D as a beginner DSLR. It's very good for the price, both for daytime usage, and astro usage. Easy to get used to, and Canon are the most supported DSLR brand by astro programs.

It's very good for both deep sky and lunar images.

It's less suited for planetary though, as it does not have a 640*480 movie crop mode as far as i know. The cheapest Canon DSLR with this future would be the 550D.

This mode uses only the centre of the sensor (the actual 640*480 pixels of the sensor) to record, simulating a smaller sensor, wich again magnefies the picture by around 7x. Meaning you get "7x closer" to the planets using this mode then with the 1100D in movie mode. Shooting full res frames and crop later is theoretically possible, but not recommended due to the huge amount of frames usually required for planetary processing (1000++ frames are very common).

As an alternative for this you can get a webcam and use this for planetary/lunar close ups.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...
There's nothing wrong with the Nikon cameras, but in the main Canon models are much better supported in terms of image capture software, so they're probably the better bet. Depending on budget and what's available the 450D or 1100D are good bets. The kit 18-55mm lens isn't great for astrophotography, but if you work to its limitations it's not dreadful either for widefield images, star trails and so on. There's also the "nifty fifty" lens which is quite handy for wide field.

If you want to connect the camera to a telescope you'll probably need a T-ring and adaptor and a programmable remote is quite handy for when you don't want to use a laptop to control the camera. An external power supply is useful too if you're going to be running exposures for long periods of time. If you don't have any other mount, a tripod is also helpful. Even though it's stationary you can still get 20 to 30 second exposures without star trailing, or even run longer ones if you want star trail images. There are some really nasty tripods around. I didn't go mad on mine, but it's ok for just a camera and small lens. If you do spend a bit more it may be sufficient for supporting binoculars too.

James

Which tripod are you using? Want to take one to Nepal this year...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

+1 for Canon 1100D. I got mine from JTW Astronomy full spectrum modded for about 400€. You can also mod it yourself if you're good with that sort of thing, there are many guides available online. You could get it quite cheap second hand & then mod it, or I'm sure it produces great results unmodded as well. :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Another vote for the Canon. I researched before getting a 1000D a couple of years ago.

Canon do seem to be the majority for beginners and experienced alike. Extensive support from the forums.

Sent from my phone :-D

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue. By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.