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scutum_med.jpg

My attempt at the Scutum Star Cloud. It was a difficult target as my garden has a 6 foot brick wall to the south which my camera FoV was barely peeking above (the wall was in part of the frame at the beginning until the area of sky reached the meridian). The wall caused some indirect reflection resulting in the purple haze at the bottom of the image. Given the circumstances I'm happy with the result. My first image since April, a refreshing feeling and I'm re-energised for some great August viewing/snapping :)

Canon 1000d (modded), CLS filter clip

70-300mm sigma lens @ 70mm

13x 6 minute exposures

darks taken on the fly

captured, processes in images plus software.

quick crop in PS

bolted to EQ6 & Ed80 for tracking /guiding

Thanks for looking

Edited by Vega
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Thanks, I used ISO 800. Just realised I mis-spelt the title wwoooops.. Scutum not sputum :grin:

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Nice image Matt. I did wonder what i was going to see after clicking on the link!

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Thanks, I used ISO 800. Just realised I mis-spelt the title wwoooops.. Scutum not sputum :grin:

Astro imaging with Great Expectorations......

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you did well to get such a nice image before it started spitting.

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It was clear all night. Rain happened during the day beforehand. And boy did it rain !

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ha ha it was a joke! sputum = spitting?

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Duuh silly me you caught me off guard lol

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