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Seeing forecast sites?


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Hi all,

I was just wondering what site/app people are using to get in idea of what the weather/seeing will be like in their viewing areas? I'd been putting a reasonable amount of faith in Meteoblue, but tonight it's telling me the sky should be unobstructed by clouds for the next few hours, with less than perfect clarity, but I'd have loved to get out, as the kids are away and I can stay out as long as I like (although there is work in the morning, but the boss is away, so I can sort of coast for the next couple of weeks.).

I realize weather forecasting isn't "an exact science", but what, in your experience, are the the best places to get an idea of whether (weather even :laugh:), it's worth going in and out of the garden every half hour to see if it's worth setting up?

Padz

:clouds1:

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I don't put much faith in any of them really.

I've read as much on meteorology as I have on astronomy over many years and study satellite images and surface analysis charts for fun. And I still don't get it right.

Most of the online weather info from the myriad sources is little more than a re-hash of Met Office output but often having little forecaster skill applied...if any!!

So that is where I look. The good old Met Office are one of a limited number of sources of original data and observations. They sell it to anyone who can afford it with little control over what they do with it.

None of the two-bit weather sites has access to very much data that isn't produced by or correlated by or relayed by the national weather services around the world.

All they do is add graphical interfaces and such like to add their own identity.

My advice would be to look for consistency between a number of sites if you must use them but I'd rely mostly on Met Office output.

The biggest downside to Met O products is in the dumbing down of public forecasts. You need to look a little deeper for specific products that meet your needs.

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Yeah, that's what the app on my phone is drawing it's data from too, and I just check their site for a forecast. Got this, but looking outside I get nowt. Can't even make out Vega...

astro.php?lon=-6.592&lat=53.381〈=en&ac=0&unit=metric&output=internal&tzshift=0

Maybe I'm just having one of those nights :sad:

Padz

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I don't put much faith in any of them really.

I've read as much on meteorology as I have on astronomy over many years and study satellite images and surface analysis charts for fun. And I still don't get it right.

Most of the online weather info from the myriad sources is little more than a re-hash of Met Office output but often having little forecaster skill applied...if any!!

So that is where I look. The good old Met Office are one of a limited number of sources of original data and observations. They sell it to anyone who can afford it with little control over what they do with it.

None of the two-bit weather sites has access to very much data that isn't produced by or correlated by or relayed by the national weather services around the world.

All they do is add graphical interfaces and such like to add their own identity.

My advice would be to look for consistency between a number of sites if you must use them but I'd rely mostly on Met Office output.

The biggest downside to Met O products is in the dumbing down of public forecasts. You need to look a little deeper for specific products that meet your needs.

Thanks, I'll bare that in mind. I suppose the problem with the third party sites, as much as anything, is that they're updated relatively infrequently. I'll give it an hour or so then I'm giving up for the night. Shame though. Was looking forward to that.

Padz

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  • 3 weeks later...

I have very little faith in any of the weather sites/apps, though I admit to being hooked to them for the couple of days before a weekend off work which is really annoying. I have known them to show clear skies and then an hour later complete cloud cover!!...I don't believe its possible to predict the weather accurately more that 2-3 hours in advance (for small areas of the UK which we require), all else is guess work.....Doesn't stop me from checking numerous sites though and raising my hopes!!

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I use an app called Astropanel (android) . Pretty accurate and handy and gives you things like humidity, transparency, cloud cover, etc. Free too!

I recently got AstroPanel. I use that, as well as regular weather forecasts to make a rough guess as to what the weather may be like. I can also sometimes make guesses based on the clouds through the day, using some patterns I notice outside (e.g if it's cloudy in the morning, and there are breaks by midday, it may be clear by night). It's interesting as well how if you get a massive cold front (rain, thunder, even hail) in the morning, it can (sometimes) be a good sign that it may clear up by nighttime.

David

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I find the seeing data supplied by most of the forecast sites pretty unreliable, but maybe it's a bit more iffy being close to the sea. However, I use the astro panel (7timer data) and met office apps on Android and the sat24 website a lot to check what's heading this way. All of the weather sites lie/get it wrong a good deal of the time, so no substitute as already said for sticking your head out of the door/window. I do find the lunar phases and darkness feature on astro panel very useful and far more reliable than the forecasts!

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I use http://www.weatherweb.net astro forecasts. They seem less inaccurate regarding cloud cover than the Beeb, though they aren't perfect. Can't speak for seeing as I'm mainly a binocular observer so it doesn't affect me so much.

I also use the IR satellite maps on the Met Office website. Looking at the animation over the past few hours will give me an idea whether, if it's cloudy, it's likely to clear soon, or conversely if it's clear now whether it's likely to overcast quickly.

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I use http://www.weatherweb.net astro forecasts. They seem less inaccurate regarding cloud cover than the Beeb, though they aren't perfect. Can't speak for seeing as I'm mainly a binocular observer so it doesn't affect me so much.

I also use the IR satellite maps on the Met Office website. Looking at the animation over the past few hours will give me an idea whether, if it's cloudy, it's likely to clear soon, or conversely if it's clear now whether it's likely to overcast quickly.

My antivirus doesn't like this page, it wont open it. Something about an embedded trojan.

I occasionally use this http://www.accuweather.com/en/gb/united-kingdom-weather

If you enter your location, select extended view, an astronomy option in very small letters appears about halfway down the page.

Its basic with a few stats and a general observation rating but it has been reasonably close to the mark for me so far.

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Meteoblue are about as good as it gets but these things are very hard.

Small point, but 'seeing' in astro-jargon means stability of the image (freedom from scintillation or twinkling.) This is often best when transparency is not that good. So 'good seeing' means stable image but not necessarily all that transparent.

Olly

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