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autonm

Moving on from a 200p Dob towards DSO imaging. (80ED or Dob mounting)

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Any suggestions on positing this to a better section then please let me know...

I have been using a 200p Dob for over a year now. I have been impressed with it and managed to take some decent pictures and web cam videos whilst nudging it around.

www.mauton.co.uk

To add to the mix I have a modded XBOX webcam along with a Canon1100d DSLR.

I have decided that I am interested in DSO and have been thinking about upgrading to a GOTO/Tacking mount such as the HEQ5 and/or 80ED.

My options are as follows, with questions on each:

1. Buy a new mount HEQ5 (not sure on exact model yet) with a 80ED Refractor.

This seems to be a good entry setup for DSO's from various posts on these forums.

Q. Will I be able to use by DSLR 1100D fine? or will I need anything further

Q. Except for the obvious improvement with a tracking mount, how will the 80ED improve the images I can take over that of the 200p ? How does the f7.5 as opposed to the f5.91 make that much difference?

2. Sell by 200p Dob and purchase a 200p on a EQ-5 mount.

It would be the same scope however I get to have a mount which can then be motor driven.

Q. Would it be worth it in any way keeping the 200p and going with option 1?

3. Has anyone mounted a 200p Dob on HEQ5 mount?

Then all I have to buy is the mount....

Q. How would the image quality etc be improved if I purchased the ED80 ?

Many questions I know !!! - But please any that you can. :grin:

Thanks

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Hi!

The HEQ-5 is definetly the way to go! It might be considered a wee bit underpowered for something as large as the 200p, but you could easily do some great images with it. The 80ED is would be more suitable in this case, but you can still have a go with the 200p while saving up. To answer your questions:

1:A - You need a T-Ring and a camera adaptor. I'm not sure if the focuser on the 200p comes with an adapter like the 200PDS does.

1:B - Both scopes would produce images, but i honestly the 80ED is easier because of the wider view. Most of the popular bright objects to start out with wont fit inside the view of the 1200mm 200P. I'd go with the ED80 if I started today. Also there are a few aspects like coma, diffraction spikes and stuff from the 200p while the 80ED might need its own flattener.

2:A It's ALWAYS worth to have 2 scopes if you plan on taking DSO photos. Since you'll basicly be having a DSLR attatched and put on auto with a timer remote or program, you will need atleast a good pair of binos, preferably an extra scope to admire the cosmos while your photo setup works.

3:A - You get wider, crisper images without diffraction spikes with the 80ED. The 200p will appear smudgier due to the focal length making it a bit more likely to show you more atmospheric distortion. However if you plan on shooting exclusively planetary, the 1200mm of the 200p along with a powermate of some kind would be best.

If I were you i'd definetly keep the dob, its a great visual scope, and start out with the HEQ-5/ED80 as a strict photograpy rig.

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Carl thanks for your reply. I am already using the 1100d with a t-ring on the 200p for imaging... problem is I only get exposures of 5-6 seconds before trails appear.

Hence my move to a motorised mount.

From reading I think the 200p will be to heavy for a HEQ5 mount and any decent imaging.

If I go the HEQ5 and ed80 route, I think I have have to start saving...

Any other further comments welcomed.

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Have you thought about an equatorial platform I`'ve just bought one for my 200p . Easy to set up and the dob mount simply sits on the equatorial mount . Cost about £450 but we'll worth it..

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Have you thought about an equatorial platform I`'ve just bought one for my 200p . Easy to set up and the dob mount simply sits on the equatorial mount . Cost about £450 but we'll worth it..

Can you give me a link to the one you purchased? I have looked at some before.

If I can get my 200p mounted onto a HEQ5, then it helps for the future if I buy another scope.

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The address is www.equatorial platforms .Co.UK David Billington runs the company and

each platform is individually prouced

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You cannot shoot long exposure DSO with that platform, you get field rotation. It's basicly still an alt-az tracking mount, not a "real" german equatorial.

Edit: It's still good for lunar and planetary, but you can still do that with any push to mount. Hate to burst your bubble but there really is no substitute for an EQ mount, unless you find a an alt-az with a wedge.

Edited by VigdisVZ

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Oh, I thought the whole point was that it did eliminate field rotation. So I guess you need a dual axis platform for that? Of course the cost then outweighs the benefit somewhat.

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I've looked at the contraption again, and it does seem that it might eliminate field curvature to a degree (but I'm not still entirely sure on how it operates), but it does not allow for more than 1 hour of tracking before needing to be repositioned. However, I think stability and vibration might be an issue here aswell. I can definetly see it as a useful tool for visual work.

Might be worth a closer look to some, but in the end I cannot se how a small wooden platform can come close to a metal german equatorial mount when you're looking at long exposure DSO).

Also, the web page has no DSO showcase images, just your run of the mill lunar and planetaries.

So I wouldn't get my hopes up really.

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EQ platform does rotate, but no guiding with the simple ones.

Got. Mine from D. Martini (Germany), via ebay, back then a bit over 200€.

The two axis platforms some offer, are even bettet though.

Also you will find a lot of guides and a yahoo group on building and explaining different setups.

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I'd be happy if I could get exposures of 5 or 6 minutes. Maximum I can do at the moment is 20 odd seconds. That yields results like this:

post-28556-0-21068100-1375447659_thumb.j

8 seconds @ ISO 1600

post-28556-0-80586500-1375447738_thumb.j

20 seconds @ ISO 1600

So 5-6 minutes would open up a whole new area of possibilities. I'm not looking to achieving competition class images.

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EQ platform does rotate, but no guiding with the simple ones.

Got. Mine from D. Martini (Germany), via ebay, back then a bit over 200€.

The two axis platforms some offer, are even bettet though.

Also you will find a lot of guides and a yahoo group on building and explaining different setups.

Thanks for the info :) I'll check out the group. I saw some DSO examples linked to from the website showing some pretty impressive results.

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Hi

Glad that the comments were of some use.The platform rotates on a curved surface bearing and is designed to be used specifically at your your latitude .It can track any celestial object.The drive motor is speed adjustable ,is silent and runs on 9volt bat.

I found it a great product. Tracked the moon for over 30mins remained dead centre at 8mm.

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I'd be happy if I could get exposures of 5 or 6 minutes. Maximum I can do at the moment is 20 odd seconds. That yields results like this:

post-28556-0-21068100-1375447659_thumb.j

8 seconds @ ISO 1600

post-28556-0-80586500-1375447738_thumb.j

20 seconds @ ISO 1600

So 5-6 minutes would open up a whole new area of possibilities. I'm not looking to achieving competition class images.

I'm not a serious AP guy. I just take wide field from a fixed tripod. I find i can only manage about 8-10s @ ISO 800 from my location................which surprises me as i dont think the LP in my garden is bad. Im ok with this though because stacking many images of these setting really helps.

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I have the Skywatcher EQ5 and ED80 which I am using with my Canon 650D (mod'd). It is a very good combination, the ED80 is fast and I am starting to get some good results.

I was up in the hills above Perth on Saturday night and I was knocked out by what I could capture.

If I can improve the polar alignment it would be even better. Polar alignment down here is ever a problem.

Maybe try and keep the dob as that give you a nice big apeture OTA for planetary work.

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