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Before light pollution.


cotterless45
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It's a double edged sword. Without industrial 'development', mass production and the such, we probably wouldn't have our washing machines, cars, electricity grids, communication systems, not tp speak of our skywatchers, celestrons, pentaxes, baaders and televues. But in doing so we as a species have paid a price to which the future will judge us by.

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The thing I fear the most is the expansion of urban areas. In a small country like the UK, there are fewer and fewer dark sites all the time... some are now protected, but I can't see "Dark Sky Status" halting the expansion of cities and industrial areas.

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The strange part is that there once was a time when we believed that we were the centre of the universe, then there came a time when we started to realise the true wonder of it all. Now it is fashionable to erase awe and wonder with the intention to develop, but develop into what I wonder.

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Light pollution is here to stay I reckon. 99.9% of the population couldn't give a stuff if they could see the Milky Way or not........

And yet how many of them are obsessed by their "Horoscopes"? :confused:

Perhaps if astronomy was more part of the national curriculum kids (Who will grow up to be tax-paying voters) will get a greater appreciation of the night sky.

Or perhaps not.

To me wiping out the view of the heavens in the name of "safety" is almost as bad as deciding to cut down every tree that's big enough to hide behind because you know *sing-song voice* "It's better to be safe than sorry" :mad:

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It's a double edged sword. Without industrial 'development', mass production and the such, we probably wouldn't have our washing machines, cars, electricity grids, communication systems, not tp speak of our skywatchers, celestrons, pentaxes, baaders and televues. But in doing so we as a species have paid a price to which the future will judge us by.

I couldn't agree more, glass has one of the biggest carbon footprints :shocked:

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Just to show what we have lost and what dark sky looks like, 1869 the Milky Way over London.post-6974-0-41750500-1374961484_thumb.jp

Nick.

not that I'm quite old enough to remember but I'd heard the sky was was quite good in London for astronomy during the black out in the 2nd world war. That is when the city wasnt alight. So I suppose it is theoretically possible to create dark skies in a modern city. Don't think dark skies are worth going to war over though :smiley:

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not that I'm quite old enough to remember but I'd heard the sky was was quite good in London for astronomy during the black out in the 2nd world war. That is when the city wasnt alight. So I suppose it is theoretically possible to create dark skies in a modern city. Don't think dark skies are worth going to war over though :smiley:

Yeah... the "raining death and destruction" kind of puts a bit of a downer on it really.

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We "emigrated" from Poole, Dorset to Ceredigion some 3 years ago. One of the primary "new home" requirements was for a good dark skies site, which I'm delighted to say we found. Much of the cause of light pollution is lack of thought. Why illuminate signs/buildings etc from the ground facing upwards? Slightly easier to install but very wasteful on illumination. Light at top facing downwards .... much better!! Better shielding and thought in directing the illuminating source would help reduce light pollution dramatically. The night sky can be one of nature's most rewarding places of study, don't allow it's steady decline to become an accepted state of affairs. You can help to make a difference.

Near to us is The Elan Valley, and under the leadership of the Head Ranger, Sorcha Lewis, the area is seeking International Dark Sky status to protect this stunning region of Wales for all to appreciate. I applaud and actively support her work to this end.

Sorry..... getting off of soap box now!!!

Les

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We "emigrated" from Poole, Dorset to Ceredigion some 3 years ago. One of the primary "new home" requirements was for a good dark skies site, which I'm delighted to say we found. Much of the cause of light pollution is lack of thought. Why illuminate signs/buildings etc from the ground facing upwards? Slightly easier to install but very wasteful on illumination. Light at top facing downwards .... much better!! Better shielding and thought in directing the illuminating source would help reduce light pollution dramatically. The night sky can be one of nature's most rewarding places of study, don't allow it's steady decline to become an accepted state of affairs. You can help to make a difference.

Near to us is The Elan Valley, and under the leadership of the Head Ranger, Sorcha Lewis, the area is seeking International Dark Sky status to protect this stunning region of Wales for all to appreciate. I applaud and actively support her work to this end.

Sorry..... getting off of soap box now!!!

Les

Yes Sorcha is doing splendid work for the Elan Valley estate. I truly hope Mid Wales gets the dark sky recognition it deserves and the protection that might come with it.

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It's bad for us, but not for the people that sell us our equipment - without it, we probably wouldn't have needed large dobs so much - or light pollution/UHC/OIII filters, which have made a ton of money for those who sold that equipment

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