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Literature...?


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Hello, anyone got a comprehensive book list of essential literature an astronomy Padawan should read?

Have been on Amazon UK and there are shedloads of books from Philip's Paperbacks to Astronomy for Dummies.

Is there a must-have book you can recommend?

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Very difficult to recommend a, or any, book for someone else I think.

Many will say TLAO, which is a book I have never thought much of. The copy I have has been opened twice in 6 years. I like The Monthly Sky Guide however. Have Astronomy for Dummies and that was opened once.

I have a couple of field guides that are good but probably too much information in them.

Really you need to search round a few book shops and see what clicks for you. You will need maybe 3 books of different things. Say you decided to observe each of the Messiers, Messier Marathon, then one showing all of them and giving information is useful and one showing easily where in each constellation they are is also a good idea.

If you observe double stars then again the same, what there is and where they are, throw variable stars into the same basic catagory.

That is just for viewing, imaging then Every Photon Counts is the apparent standard, cannot personally comment as I don't have it but many recommend that as a good book.

Odd way of putting it but even a book on telescope optics is a good idea, it is advantageous to have some knowledge and operation of the main instrument we use.

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I'd go with the Backyard Astronomers Guide by Dickinson and Dyer because its covers everything. Its got comprehensive chapters on all aspescts of astronomy; one one what scope to choose and why, one on what eyepieces, filter etc. (the pros and cons of each) all the way through to astrophotography. It even has star charts in it and a deep sky observing guide. It really is The Bible for someone just starting out like I was last year and I've read it cover to cover twice and still go back to it fo reference. Read some other peoples reviews on amazon.

http://www.amazon.co...ronomer's guide

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Very difficult to recommend a, or any, book for someone else I think.

Many will say TLAO, which is a book I have never thought much of. The copy I have has been opened twice in 6 years.

Oh my god, I'm not the only one....I thought there was something fundamentally wrong with me :D
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I'd go with the Backyard Astronomers Guide by Dickinson and Dyer because its covers everything. Its got comprehensive chapters on all aspescts of astronomy; one one what scope to choose and why, one on what eyepieces, filter etc. (the pros and cons of each) all the way through to astrophotography. It even has star charts in it and a deep sky observing guide. It really is The Bible for someone just starting out like I was last year and I've read it cover to cover twice and still go back to it fo reference. Read some other peoples reviews on amazon.

http://www.amazon.co...mer's guide

I have to agree with this. I've got a copy out from the library but when my Shell vouchers come through I shall be using them on Amazon to buy a copy of my own.

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Oh my god, I'm not the only one....I thought there was something fundamentally wrong with me :D

I must admit, while I own TAL, but I rarely opened it, used it as a reference a few times, but not ever read it cover to cover. I find myself using stellarium a l lot with a wealth of useful websites that I have accumulated in my bookmarks over time.

It is nice to have a book in you hand sometimes for reading , sitting in a chair by the fire :) but to be honest, these days the internet has so many useful astronomy sites. Astronomy books, at least for the basic starter stuff are not really essential I find so far anyway. For the more advanced stuff that will change I suspect when the info is not so easy to come by on the internet.

A book with charts or something to refer out in the field, if you do not have a tablet/handheld or laptop can be useful though.

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