Jump to content

Stargazers Lounge Uses Cookies

Like most websites, SGL uses cookies in order to deliver a secure, personalised service, to provide social media functions and to analyse our traffic. Continued use of SGL indicates your acceptance of our cookie policy.

Recommended Posts

Here is an update on the Comet ISON by John Bortle from Sky & Telescope.

http://www.skyandtelescope.com/community/skyblog/observingblog/Comet-ISON-Approaches-211408441.html

From January through May Comet ISON brightened hardly at all, remaining stuck at magnitude 16 or 15 and falling nearly two magnitudes behind the early

predictions. It became lost in twilight around the end of May and won’t be back in view until the end of August.

Comet_ison_Dec1_17_341px.jpg

In early December 2013, Comet ISON will climb up in the eastern sky at dawn, fading after its solar swingby.

So my forecast is that Comet ISON will develop more slowly in the autumn morning sky than initially thought. It won’t reach naked-eye detectability until around the 10th of November, about three weeks before rounding the Sun. It will brighten steadily but not exceed 2nd or 3rd magnitude before disappearing into the morning twilight just a week shy of its November 28th perihelion. At that time a short, not particularly bright tail should trail the comet’s intensifying coma.

On perihelion day the head of the comet may spike very briefly to around magnitude –6, brighter than Venus. It might be seen in the daytime sky as a fuzzy point by experienced observers who use great precaution when looking for the comet close to the Sun. This grandeur will persist for only for a matter of hours, as the comet will immediately begin to fade dramatically.

As ISON re-emerges in the dawn sky a few days after perihelion, its head will have faded to about 2nd or 3rd magnitude. But by now it will sport a brilliant, quickly straightening tail perhaps 10° to 15° long. This impressive tail will grow longer morning by morning, while the comet’s head becomes ever less distinct.

The crescendo of the apparition will likely occur between December 10th and 14th, when the comet will be best seen just before dawn after the Moon sets. Although little or perhaps nothing of the head will remain, the huge tail will loom in the northeastern sky. Almost evenly illuminated over its length, this rapidly fading appendage could reach from southern Hercules to the near the handle of the Big Dipper, spanning almost a quarter of the heavens as seen under good, dark observing conditions.

So: “comet of the century”? If we’re talking only about Northern Hemisphere observers, and since the century is only 13 years old, there’s still a chance.

Still not sure on finding a good observing location for this one yet, I'll be looking for a good western horizon in Spain most likely.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

To be honest where we will be has a pretty good horizon although there are hills of in the distance so I shouldn't complain too much.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Although less 'spectacular' than predictions - which is often the case with comets, Panstars put on a good show and reading this article, still much to look forward to - the tail sounds like it could be a fine sight under the right conditions. Thanks for the update.

andrew

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi All, Any feedback from the Spitzer telescope run on June 13th? When are we likely to see those results?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Although the light curve has been downgraded, the latest data suggests it has picked up a bit and could still be fairly good.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Still on course to be a good one. You will need a clear eastern horizon in the early morning at the end of Nov - Dec to see it well.

It is primarily an early morning object when at its best.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

ISON can be seen in the morning sky before sunrise near Mars, I'm not waiting until December to view it at night  :grin: 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I need to stop checking on Ison daily. The conflicting info is driving me nuts...Yesterday there was an article saying that it will, in fact, be a good one and that it should never have been reported that it wont. Today, the latest web article is predicting dissapointment

Patience....I must learn patience. I just remember how stunning Hale-Bopp was and i want my wife to experience that sight and wonder

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have the same problem Mk. All part of the fun. Some people tell me to be carefull when hyping it up. Must resist! :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

a few important days coming for ISON from 28th to the first few days in october the comet will encounter mars, directly over the north pole.

all orbital diagrams/predicted paths dont factor any planetary effects, so it will be interesting to see any changes that might happen to its trajectory or increase the discharge from its nucleus

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's the early morning business that's putting me off, maybe if I leave everything set up all night but I don't like doing that.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's the early morning business that's putting me off,.

Same here, especially as the clear skies are always on a school night.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's the early morning business that's putting me off, maybe if I leave everything set up all night but I don't like doing that.

Been getting up at 4.30 for a few days now, but only seen clouds and gone back to bed.

Dave

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.