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Any day now I should receive the Atik 11000 camera that I was lucky enough to come by in May. I have just ordered some larger filters and a new filter wheel to go with the camera. Because of this, and because the nights are not really dark at the moment, I've been doing a few astro 'snapshots' in the meantime, short duration images with a colour CCD camera.

Here's M64, the Black Eye galaxy.

Skywatcher Esprit 150ED and Atik 460ex OSC

Thanks for looking.

Tim

8c7eeee8-2708-42c2-82d3-93ceb6281a8b_thumb.png

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That's nice - particularly for a quick snapshot :)

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Very nice Tim, I feel it needs more data - but as you say, this is a "short duration" image :).

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Excellent Tim. How short is "short duration"?

Dave

Anything less than 10 hours? This is only 10 minute subs as well, feels like playing at it :-)

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What a treat! nice and smooth...

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Well Beautiful picture with an interesting resolution, Tim. It seems to me slightly "too yellow", however it is a successful test. And the 150ED esprit appears to return excellent colors, without residual chromatic even in bright stars ... :smiley:

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More very convincing resolution from the Esprit. Do you reckon it will cover the 11 meg (about which you are being far too modest!)

I can cover it with my TEC140 if I splash out a small fortune on TEC's medium format film flattener. A slightly more reasonable flat field at less than a grand would have been a nice option!!!

Olly

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