Jump to content

Banner2.jpg.35fd74882a15b2b8a1b4142f7dcc8bed.jpg

Hot Glue and Electronics


Macavity
 Share

Recommended Posts

Have recently been "extending" my Watec Video Camera control cable (Oooer Missus) for "remote" Astronomy. The control cable consists of 16, colour coded, v.THIN(!), multi-strand wires in a common 1/4" sheath. Emboldened by a US-based member of the Yahoo QCUIAG forum, I decided to try extending it via a pair of CAT5/6 cables. :)

Thing is though, the wire didn't "take too easily" to solder(?) and the insulation tended to shrink readily on application of heat! Don't do much soldering these days, so a bit of a challenge. But a combination of crimping and soldering... And Hey, it NOW works... At least over 5 metres! ;)

Having got the [minor expletive] to work, I would like to render it "permanent" - An Eddystone Diecast Box etc. I notice a lot of consumer equipment comes liberally smeared with a sort of "Solid Snot" (lol) - Particularly where cables interface to PCBs. I assume this is the new-fangled "Hot Glue"? <gasp> :p

But what is the view of the "Trade" (Even the "word on the street") re. Hot Glue and electronica? I assume it would be IDEAL for a little strain-relief re. my tiny wires? But any particular product to (not) go for? Will it be TOO hot? Attack the insulation over time? Are there better solutions etc.

Edited by Macavity
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hot melt glue would be fine to secure it but another "cold" alternative is a new product called SUGRU which a very useful material but may be a little expensive for your application

https://sugru.com/

It's amazing stuff with lots of potential uses :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thing is though, the wire didn't "take too easily" to solder(?) and the insulation tended to shrink readily on application of heat! Don't do much soldering these days, so a bit of a challenge. But a combination of crimping and soldering... And Hey, it NOW works... At least over 5 metres! ;)

It's usually very useful to use a little bit of flux when tinning wires (applying solder), the wires can become a little tarnished or maybe not enough flux in the solder and makes soldering them a bit of a challenge, using a little bit of flux fixes that. I find it easier to dip the very end of the solder into some flux before hand.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks, Teslar. Will give the Hot Glue a go! Hardly "mission critical",

but after an afternoon crimping & soldering etc. etc. :p

Thanks too, Cath - Good advice! Yes, I would normally "dip my wick ... wires", in a splendid (c.1950's?) boot polish sized tin of RED, gooey flux -- Inherited from my Dad -- But somehow long disappeared, somewhere among various house moves... :rolleyes2:

I do have my "supplier", of old-fashioned, lead-containing, multi-core solder - Thanks to SGL advice! Heck, I've done my SHARE of saving the planet, by not driving? LOL. All "heavy metal" residues firmly in my brain... ;)

Thanks Guys. Another "project" that actually looks like (vaguely) working... :p

Edited by Macavity
Link to comment
Share on other sites

A more orthodox alternative is an adhesive called Stixall. Briefly, it does what it says on the tin (or caulk sized tube). You can get it from Toolstation among others and it has the benefit of staying slightly flexible.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hot melt glue seem ubiquitous these days - pretty much everything seem to be held together with it :D I've found it very useful too. Two problems though - fingers act as a manget for it and it seems to get everywhere in fine strands :(

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You can also get lower temp hot melt glue thats kiddy and finger friendly...

You can get it and a gun for it in most craft shops...

I use so much hotmelt we buy it in 5kg boxes and use a number of diifferent glue types for different jobs... I have an "industrial" med volume glue gun that you can basically run continously...

Peter...

Sent from my GT-P7300 using Tapatalk HD

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue. By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.