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yesyes

the yesyes observatory - the build

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Read the planning, well thought ahead.

I then discovered Sketch up as a result and am now in the process of converting my 2D sketchs into a working model.

Deffo was intending on a chop saw for this Roger, i have a allergic reation to hard labour so i will be doing all i can to reduce the amount i have to do.

Cheers Chris eargly awaiting the next idea's to rob..... i mean look at :grin:

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Next will be the electrics after a few finishing touches to the outside (bit of silicone around that window frame, door handles, another few coats of wood preserver).

I already have a 5-way fuse box / consumer unit. Now I need to decide where I need sockets and switches.

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Next will be the electrics after a few finishing touches to the outside (bit of silicone around that window frame, door handles, another few coats of wood preserver).

I already have a 5-way fuse box / consumer unit. Now I need to decide where I need sockets and switches.

What ever you decide with the amount of sockets, double it and in a years time i bet your still short of them...:)

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Haven't had much time today but just enough to install the door handles and lock on the front door. I can now finally lock the obsy.

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And here is a photo from our bedroom window showing how the obsy blends in to the garden.

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More progress today.

First I applied the wood preserver Adrian recommended (Bird Brand). Nothing to see on pictures as it is clear ;)

Then I added a hook and eye to keep the front door open and also to stop it from hitting that wall next to it.

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Then I sealed the window frame where it meets the cladding with some silicone sealant

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And an end-of-day picture

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During all this time (4 hours) I tried to dry up that water that had leaked in weeks ago and had soaked into the OSB. It just didn't want to dry up on its own.

I kept a fan heater running pointing it at the wet spot on the OSB. It has helped a little but will take quite a while to get this dry. Any suggestions how I can get this to dry quicker?

Before

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After

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I must get round to putting a hook and eye on to hold my door open :D  No I haven't done so yet!! :D

Coming on nicely Chris :)  Hope you have the roof well held on before the storm hits.  Airborne roofs are to be avoided - trust me :D

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Chris, about your damp patch ....

I got a dehumidifier to control the humidity in my 'shed' (which is a lot less weather-tight than yours, btw!) It's a desiccant adsorption type like this:

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Ecoair-DD122FW-MK5-Classic-Dehumidifier/dp/B008BZVCVM/ref=pd_sim_sbs_kh_1

and is very effective at drying out the obsy. interior after a dewy night, getting the humidity back to 50% to protect the gear. It's pretty handy as a drier in the laundry room too! Obviously not worth buying one just for this incident, but if you consider getting one anyway for your observatory, this could be its first task!

If you're interested, try www.dry-it-out.com. It was a while ago, but when I got mine, the guy in charge there, Roger Banks, was himself an astronomer/ imager and recommended the best model for an obsy. ... and gave an astronomers discount as I recall.

Adrian

Edited by opticalpath

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The obsy has coped with the storm very well. Everything is still in its place and no water has come in.

One thing happened though. The silicone was probably not dry enough before the rain started. So some of it has been washed down across the cladding. I was able to get it off the front of the wood but will need to scratch it out from inside the gaps.

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All sounding very positive Chris - nearly finished?

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hard to tell when an obs is finished. these projects are never really finished. ;)

but it will be usable very soon. just the electrics left to do.

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You're dead right there Chris :D  Never got round to finishing mine :D  Fully useable though :)

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hard to tell when an obs is finished. these projects are never really finished. ;)

but it will be usable very soon. just the electrics left to do.

thats true. and i'm using an extension lead, the same one when i used to set up in the garden.  no rush here now, its usable thats all that matters, the rest will get done another day.

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"Just" the electrics. Seems to be costing me well into 4 figures.

I meant to put "just" in quotes. ;)

Why so much? Are you having it done professionally?

I'll do it all myself. There is already a cable going from my fuse box to just outside the obsy. So it's not a new circuit and doesn't need certification (any more). I will have it checked though by an electrician who will be here anyway as we will have our bathroom redone soon.

I already bought a fuse box / consumer unit with 5 MCBs (around £30), a few rolls of cable (about £1 per metre) and some double sockets. I might need a few more sockets and a bit more cable though. But shouldn't cost that much.

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200m of 63mm conduit, 80m of 10mm2 3 core SWA, some cat5, some MDPE (may as well run water down the garden) while the trench is open, garage consumer unit x3, metal clad accessories, an electrician and a man with a digger.

It adds up.

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I have already installed 3 core SWA from our back porch into the warm room but not connected it up yet.  I shall have an RCD in the porch and a cable to a 13A plug that will simply plug into the power ring main (so no approval needed).  At the obsy end I already have a garage consumer unit with RCD and two breakers - 16A power and 6A lighting and all the lighting and power circuits finished.  The comsumer unit is presently fed from a long extension lead (and 13A plug) which goes from a ring main socket in the sun lounge as a temporary measure that has been there for much longer than I intended but "real life" priorities cropped up. 

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Sorry, I was assuming an RCD plug socket at the house end but reading again expect you mean you're plugging in an RCD consumer unit and connecting the SWA to that. The RCDs should be different to allow discrimination and proper testing.

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The obsy has coped with the storm very well. Everything is still in its place and no water has come in.

One thing happened though. The silicone was probably not dry enough before the rain started. So some of it has been washed down across the cladding. I was able to get it off the front of the wood but will need to scratch it out from inside the gaps.

You can buy silicone eater to remove it - much easier and no risk of damage.

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The obsy has coped with the storm very well. Everything is still in its place and no water has come in.

One thing happened though. The silicone was probably not dry enough before the rain started. So some of it has been washed down across the cladding. I was able to get it off the front of the wood but will need to scratch it out from inside the gaps.

You can buy silicone eater to remove it - much easier and no risk of damage.

Or use aquarium grade silicone which wouldn't of run :)

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