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yesyes

the yesyes observatory - the build

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Really lovely job there Chris - very neat and tidy :)  Your garden looks nice too - love the walled path :)

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I have followed this build from the start and my favourite bit is the way you have taken your time and not rushed into this project and taken shortcuts. I will carry on following this build and can't wait to see some more finishing touches like the chequer plate step guard because all these little touches are what make it a one of a kind obsy and something to be proud of :)

Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

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Looking fantastic Chris, all your painstaking work is paying off.  Looking forward to seeing how the interior gets fitted out, which I'm sure will also be a joy to behold.

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Thanks for the nice comments.. ;)

Some more progress today. Last night I did fill the knot holes (there were quite a few) with wood filler.

post-2143-0-82278000-1382203838_thumb.jp

Today I sanded them down

post-2143-0-49060500-1382203870_thumb.jp

In hindsight, I should have used darker filler as knots are usually dark. I bought light wood filler because the wood is rather light. Doh!

Then I treated the cladding.

Before

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After

post-2143-0-28203000-1382203969_thumb.jp

What's the difference, you ask? Well, my wife and I both liked the look of the timber as it is, so I used clear wood preserver. It was like brushing water on the timber. This will need another coat later. The clear preserver is not water repellent So I'll need to use something else on top of the preserver. I was thinking teak oil. Would that be suitable?

I've had quite a bit of cladding boards left over (I must have miscalculated...) so I decided to clad the inside of the front door. Will probably do the same with the internal door and use ply for the walls.

post-2143-0-55974300-1382204235_thumb.jppost-2143-0-79920300-1382204243_thumb.jp

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Really looking good Chris. I've been off the forum a fair bit lately with work and domestic commitments and the progress you've made is fantastic.

This is up there with Malc's build as gold standards.

My obsy has stalled at the planning stage unfortunately. Having recently completed our house extension, redecorating has taken priority for the moment, but I'll be pinching a few ideas I think from your build when I re-start it.

Looking forward to seeing the inside fit-out !

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Hi Chris,

What a terrific job you have made of that build, you can be justly proud.

I do suggest though, that you add a weather bar to the bottom of the door, with a drip groove on the underside otherwise any water running down the door will run under it and inside the building.

Teak Oil will not totaly seal the wood, it always allows the wood to breath, and will not stand up to the rigors of the British weather for very long before it needs re-coating... at least 2 coats once a year.

The best clear coating I have ever found is: -

http://www.ronseal.co.uk/products/outdoor-varnish

Put a couple or more coats of this on and it will last for years.

Hope you get up and running before the winter sets in.

Best regards.

Sandy.

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That is truly a build to be proud of! :icon_salut:

You are going to be as snug as the proverbial bug in there this winter. I hope the weather plays ball and allows you to enjoy the fruits of your labour.

Good luck with the rest of the build and very clear skies.

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We've had the mother of all torrential downpours this afternoon. Not a drop inside the obsy, not even through those gaps next to the rails that I was so worried about (and haven't yet done anything about).

What a relief! ;)

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Ronseal do their "Total Wood Preserver" in clear - I know because I've used it.  I used the green mostly on my obsy but the ends of the timbers were stood in the clear for 10 mins after cutting to length.  Recommended :)

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Cuprinol Ducksback is the stuff I used.  It comes in a variety of colours and has kept my build watertight.  Although it didn't stop the wasps building a football sized nest in the eaves above my warm room!   :eek:

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Thanks for the suggestions everyone. I've ordered 5 litres of that Bird Brand stuff Adrian recommended.

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Thanks for the suggestions everyone. I've ordered 5 litres of that Bird Brand stuff Adrian recommended.

Its got to be good, its made in Norfolk...

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jealousy, Impressive, I Can't Believe It, Great Idea, That Must Have Cost A Forture, I Could Do That, I Couldn't Do That, I'll Need To Buy One Of Those, I Want One, great job, divorce and of course jealousy

these are all words i have used in the last 40mins reading and looking at this post

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Thanks Alan. I must say I'm also a bit impressed with how it has turned out so far. When I started out I wasn't sure I could make it look so nice.

At what point did you say "That Must Have Cost A Fortune"? ;)

I did go over budget; I'm around £2500 now (estimated budget was around £1500). The last big expense will be the ply wood for the internal lining.

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Its a top job Chris

I've always said if you enjoy then whatever you spend is worth it.

My obs isn't a permanent fixture, once i buy next year i'll be robbing a lot of ideas from this for my permanent obs, the PVC Cladding for the rear/side walls is very clever.

How did you find working with the cement for the footings? Have you done that before? I'm happy that i could do the wood  work from the floor up but i'd be concearned with getting the footings level & square.

Edited by Mav359

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At what point did you say "That Must Have Cost A Fortune"? ;)

I did go over budget; I'm around £2500 now (estimated budget was around £1500). The last big expense will be the ply wood for the internal lining.

That figure doesn't surprise me - mine cost about £2.7k by the time I'd done everything. 

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Its a top job Chris

I've always said if you enjoy then whatever you spend is worth it.

My obs isn't a permanent fixture, once i buy next year i'll be robbing a lot of ideas from this for my permanent obs, the PVC Cladding for the rear/side walls is very clever.

How did you find working with the cement for the footings? Have you done that before? I'm happy that i could do the wood  work from the floor up but i'd be concearned with getting the footings level & square.

Thanks ;)

Feel free to take any ideas you want. My obsy also consists of a lot of ideas I found on here and some of my own ideas.

I have never ever done anything like this before. Lots of small-ish DIY jobs but nothing on this scale and nothing with timber and certainly not concrete. I was quite afraid of doing the foundations and doing them wrong. I imagined the hassle I would have if I had to remove one (or all) of them again for some reason. But all turned out well. I did take my time and thought twice (or more) before doing any step that would be rather permanent. ;-)

I think measuring up the site square and level before starting any concrete work is THE most important step. Everything flows from there. Get that wrong and you will have problems for the rest of the build. There are some acceptable tolerances though.

As for mixing the concrete and pouring it, I did have a little bit of practice in the months before I started the obsy when I paved that little path leading up to it. More on that in my obsy planning thread (yay, more for you to read.. ;) )

http://stargazerslounge.com/topic/167847-the-yesyes-observatory-let-the-planning-begin/

In hindsight, I found the concrete work easier than I had imagined. It's hard labour but it's doable.

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If i may jump in with an "I'll second that" please - Get things level and square and check for level and square at every stage.  The rest is easy.  The one most useful tool I have is a powered chop saw - it guarantees the angle of cut (90° and 45° plus others if needed) and with simple jigs exactly repeatable cut lengths (to a millimeter or better).

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