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Help choosing Laptop for imaging


Fordos Moon
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I need to buy a laptop which will cope with BackyardEOS, and all the wonderful software we have available such as PIPP, photoshop, AS2 etc.

IT geeks with no idea what these things are have suggested 4GB RAM, 250GB+ hard drive and dual processors and min 2.5gHz processing power.

I don't want to spend any more than necessary.

I would really appreciate any tips or direction, experience, anything to be honest because looking on Amazon which is always my starting point is confusing me!

Thanks, Bob

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I don't know what the power requirements are for most the programs but I know you will be running multiple at once and 4GB RAM could do it but it will be slow. PS on 4GB would suck. Especially on a laptop. I would shoot for at least 8GB RAM. RAMs cheap so it should cost you too much more. You could probably get by with that processor but if you can either up it around 3.0 or jump to a quad core, which every is cheaper. Hard to really help without a set number on budget.

Also do you have to have a laptop? Not sure what you whole setup and situation is but could a desktop work? You can get more bang for your buck on a desktop. Plus its a hell of a lot cheap to upgrade in the future.

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I'm no IT geek but you want more than 250Gb HD, I shot 75Gb of AVI's in one two hour session on Saturn and TIFF's at 60Mb soon add up.

8Gb RAM and 1Tb HD are standard these days.

My biggest concern would be W8 , I run W7 with no problems but there may be issues with some astro stuff on W8 , worth looking into.

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Hi Bob,

Go for the best processor you can afford, anything round hard disk size of 500Gb or more will be more than ample. You can always upgrade RAM, though 4Gb will be plenty to start!.

Link to core i5 :-- http://www.laptopsdirect.co.uk/Refurbished_Grade_A1_Toshiba_Satellite_Pro_L850-1L4_Core_i5_15.6_Windows_7_A1-PSKG7E-004002EN/version.asp refurb buut still with warranty.

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I agree with Steve, a 250GB HD is quite small for imaging. I would be aiming for a 750GB or 1TB HD.

Though it is worth noting that the latest versions of FireCapture (2.3beta) can capture AVIs using a lossless codec that reduces the AVI file sizes to around 25% to 50% of the equivalent raw AVI sizes.

Cheers,

Chris

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I'm no IT geek but you want more than 250Gb HD, I shot 75Gb of AVI's in one two hour session on Saturn and TIFF's at 60Mb soon add up.

8Gb RAM and 1Tb HD are standard these days.

My biggest concern would be W8 , I run W7 with no problems but there may be issues with some astro stuff on W8 , worth looking into.

Good point on W8. If you can get W7. I have W7 and havent had a problem with any programs.

I'll disagree on the HD though....to an extent. If you do planetary then I'll take your word on it but I dont think you will ever really need a Tb HD. Once you get that high and have that much room and eventually stuff you will need to up the rest of you systems to keep up. Otherwise a Tb of stuff will slow your computer down A LOT. I would jump to 500GB if you do planetary. If you do DSO imaging then 250-500GB is plenty. You can have a small external hard drive to store all you pictures that you've finished or for future use and keep the ones you're currently working on on your laptop. Plus external HD are cheap now a days.

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If you're going to use more than 4GB of memory make sure that you get the 64 bit version of whatever Windows is installed. 32 bit versions of Windows can't handle more than 4GB.

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If you're going to use more than 4GB of memory make sure that you get the 64 bit version of whatever Windows is installed. 32 bit versions of Windows can't handle more than 4GB.

Good point. Forgot about that.

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If we get a few clear nights in a row (okay that doesn't sound very likely) I can happily get my 500GB HD dangerously close to full if I don't get a change to process the AVIs in the daytime. I now have an external 500GB USB HD attached and find myself constantly transferring files to it when I want to start imaging. I guess this is the curse of these super-fast framerate cameras!

Cheers,

Chris

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Must this machine do post processing too? Do you have a desktop PC indoors to do the grunt work? I have a much lower spec PC for outdoors scope, camera and capture and then transfer the nights data to my "main" PC, a much more powerful one.

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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Here is a suggestion, i picked up a HP 6910p on the bay, it was an ex corp used machine, in top condition with win 7 pro 64 bit, 500g hard drive 4 g ram and intel T9300 processor (fast) you would get one well under £150 and could spend a bit upgrading the memory chips, i think it supports 8g ram

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Here is a suggestion, i picked up a HP 6910p on the bay, it was an ex corp used machine, in top condition with win 7 pro 64 bit, 500g hard drive 4 g ram and intel T9300 processor (fast) you would get one well under £150 and could spend a bit upgrading the memory chips, i think it supports 8g ram

Exactly what I did :) PCs are incredibly reliable nowadays.

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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Must this machine do post processing too? Do you have a desktop PC indoors to do the grunt work? I have a much lower spec PC for outdoors scope, camera and capture and then transfer the nights data to my "main" PC, a much more powerful one.

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Yes mate need it to do whole thing. Thankfully a mate of mine in the trade has just found me one.

Thank you all for your advice it helped a lot x

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