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Ceph and Cass

Jupiter's great red spot


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Yes, well within the range of your equipment. Though it is more of a pale brown these days rather than the red of years gone by. It is generally easier to see within plus / minus 1 hour of the transit times (Jupiter rotates in 9 hours and 55 minutes). Though we are rapidly losing Jupiter to the glare of the sun in the evening, and combined with the thicker more turbulent atmosphere near the horizon, it is becoming increasingly hard at the moment. Better to wait for to become an early morning object again.

Sky and Telescope have a number of resources so you know when the spot should be passing across the visible side of the planet.

http://www.skyandtelescope.com/observing/objects/planets/38135094.html

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I am sure you will, it is worth being patient when viewing planets. Once you have found your optimum magnification for the evenings conditions it is best to just keep on looking for a good while (many minutes) you will then start to notice more detail, you also catch those few flashes of great seeing when it all seems to come together for an instant. Also, averted vision is productive.

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The 200P should however the eyepieces may be the weak point in the setup, neither the 10mm nor the barlow (if supplied) are known for their clarity of views and this could be what limits the GRS being identifiable.

Also at the distance it is the GRS is pretty small.

At an estimate it is 1/6 or 1/8 the size of Jupiter and Jupiter is not exactly massive when viewed.

The term "great" is subjective.

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Ive never knowingly seen it (even with my 8" scope). Then again, was/am i really looking for it!!!!. Once i see Jupiter and its moons, i go into a trance and just really observe the bigger picture. The first time i saw Jupiter was with a 90mm scope and i followed it for a good 5 hrs (half of a full rotation of the planet). I didn't see the GRS. Either i just missed it or gave up just before it appeared. Other factors would have also been in play that night such as the apeture of the scope,seeing etc.

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Quote "...At an estimate it is 1/6 or 1/8 the size of Jupiter and Jupiter is not exactly massive when viewed.The term "great" is subjective." - It is still bigger than Earth. I still have not seen it!

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Yep, should be no problem if scope is cooled and collimated. I can get it in a 66mm scope so 200mm will be far easier. It is pale though, and actually larger than you may think. I have often found that the barges along the belts are more distinctive than GRS these days because they are darker.

Stu

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Quote "...At an estimate it is 1/6 or 1/8 the size of Jupiter and Jupiter is not exactly massive when viewed.The term "great" is subjective." - It is still bigger than Earth. I still have not seen it!

:grin: About 2 to 3 times the diameter of the earth, huge!

It's just a very long way away.

Which is why it's remarkable that we're able to see it from our own back gardens and why I keep an eye out for it every time I look at Jupiter.

The other bonkers one is the Cassini division in Saturn's rings.

I know the contrast between the light rings and the division helps, but it's only 5000km wide.

It's astonishing that at this distance we're still able to see it.

More wonders of the universe!

Cheers

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It's one of those things that once you see it the easier it is to 'spot' as you know what to expect. Last I looked it was very pale. I could see it with my old 150p under good seeing.

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