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Daniel-K

moon hit by meteorite

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my society just emailed this link, pretty cool shame it was cloudy

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That would have been something to see.... What the likeliness though, it lasted only 1 second :(

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That would have been something to see.... What the likeliness though, it lasted only 1 second :(

Yes - talk about needing to be in the right place at the right time.

Very interesting clip - thanks for sharing.

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Good video.

Perhaps such impacts are the primary cause of those elusive Transient Lunar Phenomena?

Any dust thrown up would hang around for some time and be visible to astute visual observers?

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Any dust thrown up would hang around for some time and be visible to astute visual observers?

Why would it? The dust would follow a ballistic curve. No air= no billowing dust or dust hanging around....

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I actually managed a Moon image on 17th March, but clearly at the wrong time of day :)

James

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Why would it? The dust would follow a ballistic curve. No air= no billowing dust or dust hanging around....

I imagine dust and debris departing the impact are at ballistic speeds from a high energy impact.

From lesser impacts perhaps the debris doesn't exceed the Moon's escape velocity by a great amount if indeed at all.

Either way there would be a visual plume, however brief. Don't you think?

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I imagine dust and debris departing the impact are at ballistic speeds from a high energy impact.

From lesser impacts perhaps the debris doesn't exceed the Moon's escape velocity by a great amount if indeed at all.

Either way there would be a visual plume, however brief. Don't you think?

I wouldn't have thought so, Paul. In a vacuum any moving particles of regolith would follow a ballistic arc and would travel at speed from the point of impact. This can be seen on the Apollo landing and ascent stage launches.

http://youtu.be/xVSyaSMwxbU

Having said that, an impact plume was used during the LCROSS mission to allow analysis of the Lunar regolith at the poles. The impactor was the spent Centaur upper stage, which had a lower velocity, but a much higher mass (2300 Kg). The plume was detected by the following spacecraft. NASA thought that a plume might be visible by amateur scopes, but this turned out to be incorrect.

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Next meteor shower with a visible moon I'll set the camera up and leave it on record.

Never thought of ever doing this...

Edited by Monty

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