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It's a great book. The drawings really give you an idea of what you can actually expect to see. I have a non-spiral bound edition but I think that binding would be very useful in allowing the book lie flat for reference. Go for it

Kerry

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I had a look at it and I find it quite nice, especially to get started. I also like the "The Observer's Sky Atlas" though, it has many objects and is my favorite DSO phonebook ;-) ...but it lacks the nice object drawings that help finding things if you have no clue what to look for :-)

I also have a deepsky atlas with telrad circles, but I still like to take the other book with me.

One way to go is to read through it (amazon sample pages, google books, library, reviews) before a purchase. All of them will be a great help to find stuff though.

Spiral bound is a bit easier on the field as a book tends to slam shut or jumps to a different page when it's windy. I had a hard time a few nights ago with that problem :-)

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I have and use TLAO but feel the authors tried to cash in on a good thing when they included southern hemisphere objects. Personally I would rather they had expanded with more northern objects especially as, by their own admission, there are quite a few objects which are difficult to view from northern Europe (this is most noticeable in the section devoted to summer objects).

With the above proviso I still think this is a good introduction for the beginner.

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The "Illustrated Guide to Astronomical Wonders" is also a good book which is written in a very similar style to TLAO. It has many more objects all laid out in seasonal order with similar information, pics/sketches and directions for finding, that TLAO has. I don't know if you can get it in spiral bound form but it's definitely the next book to go for once you've been through your first 100 objects with TLAO or upgraded to a bigger scope. I have both and still use them regularly. The only thing they don't tell you is when the weather is gonna clear up lol. :)

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Yeah - you have to remember it's your first 100 objects through a small aperture scope. Great beginner book for your first scope, getting orientated with the night sky, finding stuff, and learning the seasons, what's up and when, I agree Paul. It gives a good grounding, and it's done in a nice easy to follow style. But if you get hooked then you soon want more. :)

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Yeah - you have to remember it's your first 100 objects through a small aperture scope. Great beginner book for your first scope, getting orientated with the night sky, finding stuff, and learning the seasons, what's up and when, I agree Paul. It gives a good grounding, and it's done in a nice easy to follow style. But if you get hooked then you soon want more. :)

You are right. It is without doubt a great book for beginners who decide to star-hop their way around the universe with small(er) apeture scopes or even bins. It gives a realistic impression of objects and what to expect to see and a very easy way of how to find those objects.

I think the main selling point of TLAO, is that beginners want a real scale image of what they will see with with their scope.............be it a 3-4-5" scope, and TLAO does that and shows you how to get there.

It cetainly serves a purpose, but not for very long.

I'd still say to someone who is new to astronomy and who has a manual scope, it is well worth the investment.

I believe that the latest edition includes objects visible in dobs (150-200mm).

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I think it's fab and am one who still dips into it!

Must agree with a previous post in not understanding why we have both northern and southern hemisphere in the same book, but hey!

Cheers

I agree there is no need to sell books with both Northern and Southern Hemispheres in the same book, but it seems to be the fashion. I have about 10 books on my shelf and they ALL include both. Its probably a financial thing..............cheaper to print one book with both rather then print two books with each?.

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I agree there is no need to sell books with both Northern and Southern Hemispheres in the same book, but it seems to be the fashion. I have about 10 books on my shelf and they ALL include both. Its probably a financial thing..............cheaper to print one book with both rather then print two books with each?.

I guess there's a lot more people in the northern hemisphere and so if they print separate ones the sale won't be that high on the southern hemisphere book! Just a thought!

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Simply put, it's an amazing book, it tells you what an object looks like by eye, and gives you a realistic image of what you can see. When I found M38, it looked pretty much as the book said it should. 'd definately recommend it

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It's a superb introduction to navigating the sky, but more imporantly for me, gives you realistic expectations of what you'll see. It's a great resource. Highly recommended.

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