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Have I seen stars in Centaurus low on the southern horizon?


Matt1979
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I have been trying to see if I can observe stars in Centaurus. I looked on Redshift 7 and the software shows part of Centaurus to be located to the far south of Spica in Virgo. I live in a hilly area and I can't see the southern horizon from the garden, but on Saturday night I took my telescope to a local hill that gives a good view to part of the southern horizon.

At around 11.45 I could see two fairly bright stars with the telescope very low on the horizon below Spica - would these have been in Centaurus? Redshift 7 doesn't show many more bright stars in that area, but I am unsure how many degrees part of Centaurus comes above the horizon - I would say the stars were around two and a half inches above. To the left of these stars there was quite a lot of light pollution, but around two inches (I am not sure how many degrees this is) above the horizon I saw one or two very dim stars that were only just visible through the murk.

I also tried to look for Lupus, but the part of the horizon I needed to see was blocked by houses.

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I think it's going to be a struggle.

I'm a tad further north, near Blackpool and Centaurus remains below my horizon.

Antares is just about as southerly as I can reliably see with my light pollution.

From a dark site I can see the "tea pot" of Sagitarius.

But Centaurus is a no no for me.

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I think it's going to be a struggle.

I'm a tad further north, near Blackpool and Centaurus remains below my horizon.

Antares is just about as southerly as I can reliably see with my light pollution.

From a dark site I can see the "tea pot" of Sagitarius.

But Centaurus is a no no for me.

Thanks. I will double-check Redshift 7, as the two brighter stars might have been a bit too high. There are also a lot of buildings on my southern horizon, as well as a few more hills between 5-8 miles away. I saw Antares for the first time last July just above my local hill - I want to see if I can get a good view of Scorpius this summer. Antares was a beautiful sight through my telescope, especially with all its false colours, like with Sirius I always think these colours make the star even more beautiful to see.

I was lucky to see Piscis Austrinus in December, but I haven't seen much of Sagittarius yet - I only saw a few stars close to the horizon on the same evening that I saw Piscis Austrinus

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I just put your location in Stellarium and Centaurus is still below the horizon.

All that is directly below Spica is the constellation of Corvus and some unexciting stars of Hydra.

Perhaps you are seeing Antares and it's environs? That's below and over to to the left of Spica. At the time you state Antares would have been in the haze on the SE horizon.

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I just put your location in Stellarium and Centaurus is still below the horizon.

All that is directly below Spica is the constellation of Corvus and some unexciting stars of Hydra.

Perhaps you are seeing Antares and it's environs? That's below and over to to the left of Spica. At the time you state Antares would have been in the haze on the SE horizon.

Cheers for looking - this is interesting. Redshift 7 does actually show a few stars in Centaurus to be just above the horizon, unlike Stellarium. The stars I saw were fairly bright through my telescope and were almost directly below Spica but a short distance to the right. Redshift 7 did show that some of the fainter stars to the left of the area I am describing are indeed in Hydra, although one or two in Centaurus are shown below.

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