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Glenn2214

Cassini division

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Just seen the Cassini division for the first time with the Dob...

Celebrating with Kronenbourg...

That is all...Carry on!

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Well done !

It's not all that easy despite being a well known feature. If the seeing is a bit iffy (as it is here tonight) it can be quite elusive.

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Same here - first for me as well - amazing view - wifey had a look as well - really impressed

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Just waiting for Saturn to get a bit higher...I can't believe i saw it so low...bless the 5mm xcel x....looks lovely in the 9mm as well...fitted my telrad today and was surprised at how accurate it was...good stuff all round...

I tidied up your double post for you, regards, nightfisher

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Having some reasonable views over here too with the TV76. Seeing isn't brilliant, can clearly see the difference in brightness between the A and B rings but other than in my imagination, Cassini is elusive. Some nice banding in the surface too.

Surprisingly was able to split the Double Double quite easily, down at x96 which isn't too bad. Lovely star definition in moments of better seeing.

Just come in to warm up. I seem to be in shorts and flip flops which is probably not wise ;-). Will have a little look at the moon when it clears the trees in a few mins then head to bed.

Congrats on Cassini, really nice when you get to see it.

Cheers,

Stu

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Grrrr @ the house behind...turned on 2 halogen spotlights..just for the sake of lighting up the backgarden they aren't using...lights up the entire garden and bedrooms of my place 50m away...excuse my french but some people are arses....quick word tomorrow i think...

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Just come inside, my feet are freezing

Cassini was there, in and out with 14mm (x146 mag) in my C8

It was much clearer last Friday - it jumped out at you then.

Anyway, I am happy with the glimpse I got!

Now if only the moon would leave!

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Just seen the Cassini division for the first time with the Dob...

Celebrating with Kronenbourg...

That is all...Carry on!

What magnification did you use? How big is your instrument?

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I got it quite clearly in a 4" refractor at x153 yesterday. It's about finding the right magnification, not necessarily the highest. At x197 it was harder to spot.

Stu

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I got it quite clearly in a 4" refractor at x153 yesterday. It's about finding the right magnification, not necessarily the highest. At x197 it was harder to spot.

Stu

I never seen it in a scope twice as big using 200 and 300 mags. Even though the rings and planet look sharp I never saw it. I was thinkin you may have had a 16 incher using 450 mag or something.

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I never seen it in a scope twice as big using 200 and 300 mags. Even though the rings and planet look sharp I never saw it. I was thinkin you may have had a 16 incher using 450 mag or something.

Also mines a reflector tho. Are reflectors worse for such things?

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Don't worry, there have been plenty of times when I've failed to see it in an 8" mak. It is largely down to seeing conditions and the altitude above the horizon. Sometimes smaller scopes are less affected by bad seeing than larger ones.

Back in 2003, Saturn was slightly bigger with the rings wide open at opposition, but it was also at 60 degrees altitude so was far clearer than it is this year at only 26 degrees above the horizon. Back then Cassini was very clear and the Encke gap was also visible in my 6" newt.

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There is no reason why you shouldn't spot Cassini in your scope. Make sure it is properly collimated, and give it plenty of time to cool down. Also try to avoid observing over houses if possible. Wait for Saturn to get as high as possible then you will be looking through less of the atmosphere. Try different magnifications but probably around x160 to x220 are worth a go. Lastly I guess, be patient. Spend plenty of time at the eyepiece so you catch to moments of good seeing when everything looks pin sharp and you should get it. Also try over a number if different nights to catch the best seeing, it really does make a difference.

Hope that helps a bit.

Good luck.

Stu

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It's one of those features that can be tricky to spot for the 1st time but subsequently, as you know what to look for, it's quite a bit easier. There are quite a lot of targets like that in this hobby :rolleyes2:

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as said cassini is a strange beast, it pops sometimes in a 90mm other times you struggle with 10" mag helps but seeing dictates the max you can use.

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