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kona

Hello from birmingham

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Hello to all

Have decided that another thing i must do in my life is to observe the sky's as a occasional hobby.

Living in a city with high light pollution will mean some driving and a telescope easy to transport.

Will be reading up on what to to do as a complete novice to this.

What i have managed to note down so far is not to spend to much or to little on a first telescope.

Sky watcher seem a good first buy!! and may buy a second hand motorized setup to start with the 130p seems a good first telescope.

Then buy better once i have more understanding of the skies above.

Will of course be asking questions but i expect all i have to ask is already here to be found.

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Hi and welcome to the lounge,

there is always help and advice, just ask.

Good Luck

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Hi Kona & a warm welcome to SGL...

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Hi and welcome to the forum. It is understandable to want to rein in the budget when starting out in case your expectations aren't met. However in the absence of a known budget I would suggest the following considerations.

Firstly, whatever you buy ensure it is a reputable brand and a popular size and design of scope, as this will make it easier to sell it on and being more desirable, will help hold its value over the longer term helping to reduce any loss made on the original purchase price - so going really cheap isn't always the best option. I would also argue that a scope is popular for a reason (e.g Skywatcher 200P) and so you are more likely to experience greater enjoyment and ease of use from this scope too. Lastly, before buying any scope I would strongly recommend that you go along to a number of public observations sessions that are typically organised by your local astro/observing club, as this will help you formulate what size and type of scope will best met your expectations. It is also useful in enabling you to get up close to some of this kit and to ask specific questions on it such as set up and cool down times and how portable it is should you need to travel to a dark site etc. Making sense of what all the specifications on a scope actually mean can be quite bewildering and so going along to these sessions will very quickly help you calculate what all these numbers actually mean in the real world and can further help you establish an effective compromise between cost and enjoyment that is right for you. When listening to the details about a specific scope, also remember to make a note of the eyepiece that you are looking through, as some of them can make quite a difference to the final view that you see. Knowledge of looking through a given eyepiece will also help you later on when you come to eventually upgrade any eyepiece that came with the scope. Hope that helps.

Clear skies and hope you enjoy the forum.

James

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Hi Kona and welcome to SGL,

"Have decided that another thing i must do in my life is to observe the sky's as a occasional hobby", Perhaps a decent pair of binoculars, to enable you to learn your way about the night sky, before you even spend any money on a scope, should also be given careful consideration before you make any final decision. Many have gone down this route and have had the benefit of the knowledge gained, to enable them to take the next step and acquire a scope entirely suited to their needs. Whatever you decide, enjoy your Astronomy :)

John.

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You will be surprised what you can pick out from the skies of Birmingham!

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Hi and welcome to the forum. It is understandable to want to rein in the budget when starting out in case your expectations aren't met. However in the absence of a known budget I would suggest the following considerations.

Firstly, whatever you buy ensure it is a reputable brand and a popular size and design of scope, as this will make it easier to sell it on and being more desirable, will help hold its value over the longer term helping to reduce any loss made on the original purchase price - so going really cheap isn't always the best option. I would also argue that a scope is popular for a reason (e.g Skywatcher 200P) and so you are more likely to experience greater enjoyment and ease of use from this scope too. Lastly, before buying any scope I would strongly recommend that you go along to a number of public observations sessions that are typically organised by your local astro/observing club, as this will help you formulate what size and type of scope will best met your expectations. It is also useful in enabling you to get up close to some of this kit and to ask specific questions on it such as set up and cool down times and how portable it is should you need to travel to a dark site etc. Making sense of what all the specifications on a scope actually mean can be quite bewildering and so going along to these sessions will very quickly help you calculate what all these numbers actually mean in the real world and can further help you establish an effective compromise between cost and enjoyment that is right for you. When listening to the details about a specific scope, also remember to make a note of the eyepiece that you are looking through, as some of them can make quite a difference to the final view that you see. Knowledge of looking through a given eyepiece will also help you later on when you come to eventually upgrade any eyepiece that came with the scope. Hope that helps.

Clear skies and hope you enjoy the forum.

James

Hi James thankyou for the advice.

Trouble is i'm a very independent person i like to learn from scratch on my own and the troubles that can come with that i see as a challenge and fun.

When i see saturn for example i want to do it for myself and mistakes will happen but i enjoy that if it makes sense.

That's why these forums will be excellent for me if i try and i fail i can ask for help but i will still have to do it for myself physically.

But for to me going looking through others telescopes etc will dampen the delight when i then look through my first telescope.

Willing to pay £200-£250 for a first scope maybe £300 if worth the extra.

If i buy a telescope and it includes a motor i will not use it until i can find things for myself as i said earlier i like a challenge.

I hope this makes sense to you all and thankyou for all the welcome messages :grin:

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