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Obsy plans - what do you think to this idea


fondofchips
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I have spent most of the day measuring up & drawing plans for my obsy when I came up with an idea that might save money.

I was intending on using a 12 x 8 shed with a partiton for the warm room at 4 foot built to suit similar to the classic design of shed with a warm room with flat roof adjacent.

Similar to this http://www.iankingimaging.com/show_products.php?category=184

There is a slight slope on the site so I drew out the following: -

8 x 8 shed with a 8 x 4 shed adjacent set 6" lower so that the sliding roof clears the warm room roof easier.

This means there are no headroom issues either as I'm 6' 2" tall.

Doors alongside each other on the outside of each shed opening outwards, I think this is the best way of keeping the warm room warm & no problems with door opening.

The join between the 2 sheds gives greater support for the roof support frame.

I would expect 2 standard size sheds should cost less than a specially made 12 x 8.

Price from the place locally that I have had 2 good quality sheds & a summerhouse from is £990 for both sheds & they don't mind altering anything to suit.

Gives me about £400 for the extra bits needed, roof runners etc compared with a specially made obsy.

For someone on a budget & some patience sheds could be bought used to save even more, or warm room added afterwards.

Any thoughts?

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The frame will need strengthening as dmahon says but it's not difficult or expensive to do it. My own 7' square obs is a converted shed and I added strapping to the walls and bottom edge of the roof along with some metal corner brackets at the top and halfway down.

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The subject of converting an off the shelf shed has been debated lots of times on the forum. The general consensus is that by the time you have beefed up the framework and braced the structure to handle the conversion you might as well of built the thing from scratch. It's a path most of us here ( Gina, Wayne to name a few) have followed when we all researched the same conclusion. The cost also works out about the same, but you'll have a far sturdier building.

index.php?app=core&module=attach&section=attach&attach_rel_module=post&attach_id=59385

I built the observatory above in 2011. The cost of materials came to £1800, and that included 400 bricks, and over a tonne of concrete for the foundation and the custom pier adapter. I could of saved a few hundred pounds if I had sourced the studding from a builders rather than a local DIY chain, but at the time that was the route I took. The structure is 2.2m x 4.8m with an insulated office / warm room of approx 2.2m x 2.2m and scope room of 2.2m x 2.6m. It's built to traditional standards where all stud work and floor hoists (150mm x 50mm) were fixed at 16" centres.

index.php?app=core&module=attach&section=attach&attach_rel_module=post&attach_id=39484

One of the most costly items was the shiplap which came to over £500, and its well worth using quality shiplap IMO.

The best bit is that you end up with something that you can be really proud of, and suits your individual needs.

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Thanks for all the replies, woodwork isn't my favourite pastime or skill so I'm using a local shedbuilder for that part of the build.

He has made obsy's before so I'm looking forward to seeing pictures & plans of the ones he's already done.

I already have a shed & a chicken house made by him, both good quality & value.

Want to be ready by the time the next comet arrives later in the year.

The only thing I have noticed is that some obsy's have a opening roof that covers the entire structure when only the viewing area needs to have an opening roof.

The extra strength needed for a full size roof seems to add weight & cost to the project.

But in any case a big THANK YOU to you all for sharing your obsy builds with all of us at SGL.

Edited by fondofchips
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The only thing I have noticed is that some obsy's have a opening roof that covers the entire structure when only the viewing area needs to have an opening roof.

The extra strength needed for a full size roof seems to add weight & cost to the project.

The designs that have the full roof which runs off on to support rails means that the centre section (warm room) always have cover and saves building a fixed roof over the warm room. The drawback is that the roof can be harder to mood due to the weight, and requires a larger foot print as you need to accommodate the supports for the run off rails.

You mentioned wood work is not one of your strengths, but it's not difficult to make a frame work up and bolt the sections together and then clad them with shiplap. However, sounds like you have a plan and we're all looking forward to watching your build thread when you get started

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Gina, I think he means having a door on the dividing wall between the scope room and warm room. This helps keep the warmth in the warm room if running a heater :) I didn't read his post of having two separate buildings, but could be mistaken

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Exactly. I have a sliding door between warm roor and scope room with a window in it to see what's happening with the mount when I'm in the warm room. And it's only a few steps to go between the two. I don't have to go out in the full blast of the bitterly cold wind that we've been having so much of.

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I've now talked over my plans with the shed builder & as commented here by SGL members he advises one structure with an insulated partiton between the two sections.

I'm only an observer at the moment so I'm not operating the scope from the warm room.

I think having the doors on the outside makes the inside of each compartment much tidier inside.

8 x 8 observing area isn't going to give me a lot of room to put laptop, accessories etc. anywhere.

12 x 8 is as big as I can go so I'm just making the most of what space I have.

I've started dig out my base at 13 x 9 feet which gives me some movement to line up the shed with the pier mount.

This means I can use a row of 2 x 1 foot slabs in each direction & I will only have to cut one slab to allow for the pier base. (Rest of base is 2 x 2 foot slabs).

Base & pier mount hole is now dug out, I'm pushing on as rain is forecast.

Edited by fondofchips
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I have started to upload pictures of my obsy build into my Gallery, for anyone who wants to follow my build.

The progress will slow down for a while during May as I'm on holiday for a couple of weeks.

Thanks to everyone here for the replies & advice, much appreciated.

Pictures here: - http://stargazerslounge.com/gallery/member/28193-fondofchips/

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  • 7 months later...

Had a call from my shed building friend & the obsy will be built up less final extras & fittings by Thursday this week, so after a long summer of laying the base etc. the project will finally be completed.

Pictures in my Gallery as soon as I get to see it.

Can't wait now, especially as I bagged my first DSO last Friday, Running Man nebula in Orion.

Will start a proper thread when the obsy is installed.

Clear skies to all of you & thanks to everyone who has put their build here & answered questions, much appreciated.

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