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Globular star cluster M13 in the constellation Hercules at a distance of 25,000 light-years and 145 light-years in diameter taken from Kielder Spring Starcamp 2012.

5" Takahashi Refractor

Pentax K5

iso 800

x5 375sec exposures with extender.

Deep Sky Stacker

No Flat Frames

No Dark Frames

(Quick & Dirty)8601980332_576eaf1c5f_o.jpg

M13 by mikeyscope, on Flickr

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Thanks for kind feedback folks ....appreciated!

Prefer imaging ....afraid a bit lazy at getting down to processing :computer: only a year behind with a backlog still to do......not bad for me! :icon_neutral:

Obviously this image needs more exposure data for smoother result....... one to return to I think.

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I would have thought you'd be well up to date with processing with all this dreadful weather and very little image capturing lately :D Anyway, now you've made a start at the processing I'll expect to see many more great images from you :)

Edited by Gina
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