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Best Books on Astrophotography


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I'm picking up an 8" Meade SCT tomorrow (hopefully), and my ambition is to eventually get into dong some astrophotography, however before I dive in I'd like to do a bit more reading on the subject, and I was wondering if anyone could suggest a few good books on the subject? I've been reading loads online but a good reference style book, or even better a beginners book would be nice. Thanks.

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Another recommendation for Steve's book, a good general introduction to AP. I'm sticking with a DSLR for now rather than CCD or webcam, and for that I would also recommend Michael Covington's Digital SLR Astrophotography.

Pete

Perhaps this isn't the right thread to ask this question, but is there a reason to go dslr rather than ccd or webcam? I was thinking of maybe going the dslr direction if only because I could use it as an every day camera when not attached to my scope...

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CCD for deep sky, webcam for planets, if you want the best quality available. There are lots of advantages to CCD but they are significantly more expensive than DSLRs. What they are not is more complicated. This is a myth. Mono CCD can be used on clear moonlit nights which is a major bonus.

Olly

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That's probably the only reason too... :) If you allready have a DSLR, you can use it for AP as well, and it saves you some money. Also, if you don't have any DSLR, but want one anyway for daytime use as well, it's a good combination. It's also a lot cheaper then a high quality ccd.

DSLR usually also have a larger sensor (most popular are Canon DSLR with their APS-c sensor), giving you a wider FOV then a webcam and most entry level CCDs (they exist with larger sensors too of course). Therefor webcams are usually used for planetary.

But in the end, a good quality CCD is almost always going to be better. Cleaner image with less noise, more sensitive to IR, smaler and lighter (=better tracking as you get less load on the mount), and so on.

Personally i haven't read any books myself, so i can't recommend any. But if it's one book that gets mentioned over and over again, it is for sure "Making Every Photon Count" by Steve Richards.

Edited by Jannis
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As a DSLR owner I have found Digital SLR Astrophotography by Michael A. Covington to be very good. Good insight for Canon and Nikon owners. IMHO its the best for a beginner with a DSLR.

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