Jump to content

Stargazers Lounge Uses Cookies

Like most websites, SGL uses cookies in order to deliver a secure, personalised service, to provide social media functions and to analyse our traffic. Continued use of SGL indicates your acceptance of our cookie policy.

stargazine_ep28_banner.thumb.jpg.b94278254f44dd38f3f7ee896fe45525.jpg

stickbow

Help for a beginner

Recommended Posts

Hi everyone

I would like to start taking pictures of planets and the moon and maybe some dso's.

I have a skywatcher max 150 pro maksutov,with an 1800mm focal length this is on a HEQ5 pro synscan, I have been told to get a digital camera body and connect it the the scope without an eyepiece in the scope or lens on the camera. It has been sugested that I take several short videos and then use registax to stack them.

I don't know if this will work or how I can focus the camera, any help will be appreciated.

Cheers

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi everyone

I would like to start taking pictures of planets and the moon and maybe some dso's.

I have a skywatcher max 150 pro maksutov,with an 1800mm focal length this is on a HEQ5 pro synscan, I have been told to get a digital camera body and connect it the the scope without an eyepiece in the scope or lens on the camera. It has been sugested that I take several short videos and then use registax to stack them.

I don't know if this will work or how I can focus the camera, any help will be appreciated.

Cheers

There are two "setups". One for imaging planets (and Moon) and one for DSO's.

For planets, movies (AVI format), are best usually using a webcam and then stacking the individual movie frames using Registax or similar. Focusing can be done by viewing the output of the webcam on your laptop screen. Some software packages have tools to help you focus webcams.

DSO's tend to need a digital SLR and long exposures. Focusing is trickier but taking images of a brightish star with a Bahtinov mask helps to achieve focus and then remove the mask and move on to the DSO.

There are many other methods of focusing you just have to find one that works for you.

You scope is probably better for planets but DSO are perfectly possible.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

thanks for the reply but i do not want to take computers about so it will just be the slr for now.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

thanks for the reply but i do not want to take computers about so it will just be the slr for now.

You really need a computer with the SLR to view the images. It is seriously difficult focusing an SLR in the dark on a star using the viewfinder or LCD display.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You really need a computer with the SLR to view the images. It is seriously difficult focusing an SLR in the dark on a star using the viewfinder or LCD display.

I would suggest though that using a Bhatinov mask, focusing as best you can. Then view the image and zoom in as far as you can. This will allow you to 'tweak' the focus to get the correct Bhatinov pattern. I never use a computer with DSLR just the mask.

HTH

Cheers

Jamie

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i have a laptop with registax for processing the images but i do not want to take it around with me, also how can i focus with no eyepiece or lens

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You dont need lens or eyepiece. The Scope is acting as the lens and the DSLR as the eyepiece as it were. Attach the DSLR using a suitable T Ring to scope focus and shoot. Either Video for stacking in Registax (Planets, Moon) or long exposures for DSO's

A Bhatinov mask is placed over the end of the scope and you take a picture. Check the image on the DSLR and you will see a certain pattern. (Google Bhatinov mask) you can adjust the focus from there.

Cheers

Jamie

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

http://www.nightskyimages.co.uk/bahtinov_mask.htm

See the above.

I use the B mask, as has been said, without a laptop and just zooming in to the star on liveview. It's really bright and clear. Once focused, just slew to your target, and then centre if necessary. I take 5-10 second test shots to see how the object is centred. It's a bit of a flaff getting it centred as I never know how the scope will move! But that's all I do.

Is that your snake? Gorgeous. I have a corn snake called Whizzbee who's wonderful.

Alexxx

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This may seem daft but I can,t understand how to focus with only the camera body attached to the scope because the SLR cameras that I have used before I always focus using the lens.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Focus using the telescope's focusing mechanism while looking through the camera eye-piece (or live-view if your camera has it).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The scope is acting as a camera lens. When looking through your scope using an eyepiece as you focus the eyepiece moves in or out (or in your case the mirror moves inside) to focus the image to your eye. When you attach a DSLR direct you focus on the imaging chip in the camera.

Essentially you are attaching a 1800mm lens to your camera.

Hope that makes sense? If you haven't already, buy the book (Making Every Photo Count) by Steve (Steppenwolf on here I believe)

Cheers

Jamie

Edited by JKB

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

your scope would produce great images of jupiter & saturn as well as mars. For this you just need a webcam, you can get them for around £60-150 for a good starter one. I used to have an opticstar px 35-c was around £150 and produced some great images with the 127 mak. If your looking into deep space long exposure you need to get your f stop down quite a lot with a reducer or something similar but for around the same cost you would be better just getting a 150pds and sticking it on your heq5 for when you want to do some deep space stuff.

My advice would be to start out in planetary imaging as you are not going to have to fork out a fortune to get up and running. Then move over to longer exposure DSO imaging when you feel you can afford it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.